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Author Topic: Triple Hanging at Maidstone 1872  (Read 144 times)
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« on: January 19, 2017, 11:32:47 AM »

TRIPLE EXECUTION AT MAIDSTONE. MAIDSTONE, Tuesday Morning.-At half-past nine this morning a triple execution took place within the walls of Maidstone Gaol, when Francis Bradford, who murdered one of his comrades at Dover; Thomas Moore  'Murdered his wife at Ashford and James Tooth, the murderer of a drummer-boy at the Marine Barracks, Chatham, paid the last penalty of the law. The three men were tried, convicted, and sentenced to death by Mr. Baron Bramwell, at the recent Summer Assizes at Maidstone. All three murders were of a most brutal character and the efforts which had been made to obtain respite were unavailing. All the prisoners according to the report of the Rev. Mr. Fraser, the Chaplain and the officials of the prison, appear to have conducted themselves in a most exemplary manner since their conviction, and none of them appear to have entertained the least hope that the sentence would not be carried out. On Saturday last Tooth expressed a desire to write to the brother of the murdered lad, who is a corporal in the Marines, to ask his forgiveness for the crime. He addressed him as "Dear Corporal Stock," and went on to say that he was about to ask him to do something which he was afraid was very difficult, and it was to forgive him for the ------of the poor boy, his brother. The prisoner went on to say that it had been reported that he committed the act from some feeling of revenge, but he assured him, on the word of a dying man, and who would soon be in the presence of his God, that no such feeling ever entered into his mind, and that he loved the poor boy," and at the time he committed the act he did not know what he was doing. The prisoner requested him to forgive him, and to write to him to that effect. It appears, however, that the brother of the murdered lad, instead of writing ex- pressed a wish to see the prisoner, and to assure him that he forgave him, and he had an interview with the prisoner, who again assured him that he entertained no malice towards the deceased, and that the act was quite unpremeditated. The brother told him that he forgave him, and the prisoner appeared a good deal gratified by what he said. As regards the other two prisoners, Moore and Bradford, it appears that they have both exhibited extraordinary firmness, and Moore, almost immediately after his conviction, admitted his guilt, and requested the Rev. Mr. Fraser, the chaplain of the prison, to inform the counsel who defended him, the Hon. Mr. Stanhope, that he was guilty, and at the same time to express his thanks for the able manner in which he defended him. The boy Bradford declared on several occasions to the Chaplain that until the instant when the dreadful act was committed he had no animosity against the deceased man, but he said he was constantly reporting him for little petty acts of annoyance, and in an instant the thought occurred to him to get rid of him. The prisoner was described by the chaplain and the warders as being a lad of apparently affectionate disposition; and when the Rev. Mr. Fraser was about leaving him yesterday evening the reverend gentleman bade him good night, and said he wished he could have done more for him, in allusion to the efforts that had been made to obtain a reprieve, he burst into tears and said, Oh, Sir, you have done a great deal for me. You have been very, very kind, and so has the school- master." The Chaplain (the Rev. Mr. Fraser) was in the prison this morning at six o'clock, and shortly afterwards he administered the sacrament to the prisoners Moore and Bradford. It should be stated that although the other prisoner, Tooth, was represented to be a Wesleyan, and Mr. Fraser was, therefore, precluded from seeing him officially, still, at the earnest request of the prisoner, he on several occasions had interviews with him, and the prisoner expressed himself gratified to the Chaplain for his kindness. The Rev. Mr. Allen went to the prisoner on Monday evening, and remained with him until he retired to rest, and he was with him again at an early hour this morning, and remained with him till the last moment. The execution was fixed to take place at half-past nine o'clock, and shortly before that time Mr. Brennen. the Under Sheriff of the county of Kent, arrived at the prison with some of his officers, and at this time the representatives of the press were also admitted. The ceremony of pinioning then took place by Calcraft and his assistant. Moore was the first who was taken to the scaffold, and then Bradford, and while the preparations were going on the other culprit, Tooth, remained in the cell with the Rev. Mr. Allen. All tbe prisoners exhibited extraordinary firmness, indeed Tooth appeared perfectly unconcerned, and no one could have imagined, from his cool and collected demeanour, the awful position in which be stood When all was ready, he also was taken to the scaffold, and the rope was at once placed round his neck, and the drop fell almost immediately. Tooth and Moore, who were large, heavy men, appeared to die almost instantaneously. Not so the boy Bradford he struggled violently for two or three minutes before life was extinct, and long after his wretched companions were hanging on each side of him a couple of lifeless corpses, he was struggling in the agonies of death The bodies, after hanging for an hour, were cut down, and in the course of the day an inquest was held by Mr. Dudlow, the borough coroner, and the usual formal verdict was returned

The Cambrian 16/8/1872
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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2018, 09:58:24 AM »


Francis Bradford's case :-

London Evening Standard - Monday 03 June 1872

Late on Friday night a shocking murder was perpetrated at the Citadel Barracks, Dover.  Francis Bradford, a private in the 3d Buffs, aged only 19, being noisy in his quarters, a married comrade threatened to report him, and left the room as if for that purpose.  After they had retired to bed and the lights were out, Bradford went to his kit, drew his bayonet, and then going over to the bed of the other man stabbed him through the clothing, the weapon entering the abdomen to a depth of four inches.  The unfortunate man, Daniel Donohue, expired almost immediately. On Saturday Bradford was taken before the borough magistrates, and committed for trial on the charge of Wilful Murder.
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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2018, 10:05:33 AM »

James Tooth's case :-

Dover Express - Friday 05 July 1872

District Intelligence.

CHATHAM. Murder at Chatham
.—Shortly after one o'clock on Sunday afternoon a determined murder was committed at the Royal Marine Barracks, Chatham, by a prirate of that corps named James Tooth, aged 42, the victim being a drummer in the regiment, 17 years of age, named George Thomas Stock.
The murder was committed in the privates reading and recreation room at the rear of tha barracks, where the deceased was reading at the time. The accused, who, it was stated had entertained feelings of revenge against the deceased for some time past, appears to have entered the reading room, which it being the hour for dinner, no one but the deceased was seated, and approaching him from behind, cut his throat with a razor in the most determined manner.  The accused then appears to have left the room and walked towards his quarters in another part of the barracks. The unfortunate deceased staggered into the room of Sergeant Plumpstead, with the blood streaming from his throat, but he was unable to articalate anything.  He was immediately conveyed to the Melville Hospital, where he expired shortly afterwards.
After the occurrence Tooth went to the washbouse where was seen to wash the blood from his bands, and immediately afterwards was arrested. On being taken before Lieutenant Price, the orderly officer, at once admitted that he had committed the murder, but when asked for his motive for crime replied "That is my business".  The prisoner was then removed to the cells, where, on being searched, he handed to Provost-Sergeant Fowler a razor covered with blood, which he took from his trousers pocket, stating that a little while ago be had got drunk, and the deceased then nearly got him into trouble. Since that time had determined to have his revenge ; "and" he added. "now I have got it".  During this time the prisoner did not appear in any way excited, and asked for a rag on which to lie down for the short time he had to live.
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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2018, 10:22:53 AM »

Thomas Moore's case :-

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 11 June 1872

SHOCKING MURDER AT ASHFORD.

On Sunday week all Ashford was startled with the intelligence that a murder of a most atrocious character had been committed in the immediate neighbourhood of the town.  The victim was Mary Ann Moore, age 51, the daughter of a respectable farmer named Tappenden, living at Kennington.  The suspected murderer is her husband, Thomas Moore, formerly a member of the Kent County Constabulary stationed at Ashford.  Having been dismissed the force for his drunken habits, he entered the service of the South Eastern Railway Company, in whose factory at Ashford he worked for some years. In February last he was dismissed the Company’s service for bad conduct, and shortly after left the town.  In the meantime his wife, the deceased, had left him in consequence of his drunkenness and ill-treatment of her, and was living with her father at Kennington.
On Saturday the 1st inst, she left her home in the morning at about ten o’clock to post a letter. On her way she spoke to her brother, Mr. Thomas Tappenden, a farmer occupying the Parsonage Farm in Ashford parish, and again on her return at half-past twelve o’clock. When, however, her brother returned to his father’s house at six o’clock in the evening, she had not returned, and, as it was not known that she had any business to detain her so late, her relations became anxious to know what had become of her, and instituted a search. Mr. Tappenden called at the houses of several friends whom she sometimes visited, but could gain no tidings of her. He therefore gave information to the police.
On the following morning P.S. Baker went over to Kennington, and, assisted by the friends of the deceased, instituted a close search. About three o’clock in the afternoon Mr. Charles Tappenden, a brother of the deceased, found her body lying on the bank of a ditch in a field belonging to Mr. Amos.  Mr. E. W. Thurston, surgeon, was at once sent for, and, on making examination of the body found she had been dead some hours. Suspicion falling on the prisoner, he was taken into cusody the same evening, and brought before the magistrates on Monday. Thomas Tappenden gave evidence in accordance with the facts given above.


Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 15 June 1872

Mr. Edward Whitfield Thurston, surgeon, of Ashford, deposed to examining the body in the field.  He found the body lying on the back, dead, rigid, and cold, there was a wound the left temple about one inch long, reaching to the bone, also scratches and bruises on the left side of the neck, extending from the ear to the collar bone, the parts being also much swollen.  Blood was effused in both eyes, the tongue swollen, livid, and protruding from the teeth. On the right wrist and arm were many scratches and pieces of skin torn away.
On a subsequent examination with the assistance ot his partner, he found that slight decomposition had set in, the wound on the temple straight and even and one inch long, reaching to the bone, the parts around the wound being swollen and discoloured, effusion in both eyes; a wound, such a one as would be produced by severe kick from a heavy shod boot (like that produced) one marked impression on right side of neck, as if made by a thumb or finger. Both forearms, more particularly the left, smudged with sooty dirt, scratches and pieces of skin torn off the right wrist.
On removing the scalp an injury to the skull was found corresponding to the wound, a small piece of the outer table of the skull being shelled off. On removing the skull the brain was generally congested and insuch state corresponding with the wound. The skull was fractured through. The muscles and parts around the larynx were infiltrated with fluid and clotted blood, and the lungs were gorged with blood, from his examination he concluded that death was caused through strangulation from pressure of hand on the throat. The deceased was aged 51. The injuries to the skull might also have produced death though at a later date.
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