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Author Topic: The Focke-Achgelis Autorotative Kite  (Read 358 times)
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John
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« on: February 11, 2017, 22:38:00 PM »

The Sphere - Saturday 13 August 1949

The Focke-Achgelis kite, which came to grief at the start of its tests on Southampton Water, was originally designed by the Germans to provide a well-positioned look-out for submarines dispersed along the routes likely to be used by Allied convoys. There is no evidence that the machines were ever used operationally by the Germans, but several were found in captured U-boats. About 200 of these autogiro gliders had been completed by Weser Flugzeugwerke of Delmenhorst at the end of the war. They are single-seat machines with an empty weight of 180 lb. The rotor diameter is 24 ft. and the whole contraption packs away in a box 6 ft. by 3 ft., with a depth of 3 ft. The kite, which is normally towed from a submarine deck by a steel cable working from a winch, would reach a height of about 200 ft. when tethered to about 500 ft. of cable. The pilot was connected to the submarine by telephone and in the event of an alarm requiring the U-boat to crash-dive, he could release himself from the tow, probably saving the U-boat but at the same time placing himself in a predicament.

THE R.A.F. PREPARES TO TRY OUT THE FOCKE-ACHGELIS AUTOROTATIVE KITE.
The kite, which was intended for use by German U-boats in spotting enemy concentrations and which has been brought to this country for testing, is seen in its take-off position at the rear of an R.A.F. launch. The experiment on Southampton Water did not take place, however, as a gust of wind caught the rotor as it was gaining momentum, and one of the blades was carried away

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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2017, 22:41:38 PM »

The Sphere - Saturday 13 August 1949

SQUADRON LEADER CABLE IN THE SEAT OF THE AUTOROTATIVE KITE
He is the helicopter test pilot at the Ministry of Supply Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment. About 200 of these autogiros were completed by Weser Flugzeugwerke of Delmenhorst before the end of the world war. They were designed to reach a height of about 200 ft.

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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2017, 22:45:10 PM »

The Sphere - Saturday 13 August 1949

ATTEMPTING TO TAKE OFF IN A STRONG WIND
The kite on its launching platform a few moments before the mishap which caused the project to be abandoned temporarily. The pilot explained that although the machine had already made test flights, and its behaviour was now well understood, this was the first time any attempt had been made to fly it under such boisterous conditions.

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pomme homme
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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2017, 15:37:05 PM »

Fa.330 Bachsteltze (Water Wagtail)

At least eight examples of this single-seat autorotative kite, manufactured by Weser Flugzeugbau at Hoykenkamp, near Bremen, were shipped to the United Kingdom in about 1945. They were c/ns 100032, 100143, 100406, 100502, 100503, 100509, 100545 and 100549. Normally towed, and therefore flown, from a submarine deck by a steel cable, working from a winch, some were tested, towed by a lorry, at the Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment, R.A.F. Beaulieu. Being one of the smallest, and therefore easiest, of ex-enemy aircraft to store and display, the majority are extant at various locations.

[The Captive Luftwaffe, Kenneth S. West - Putnam, 1978]
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2017, 08:23:57 AM »

The Sphere - Saturday 13 August 1949

THE GREAT EXPERIMENT COMES TO A PREMATURE END.
An R.A.F. engineer rescuing the broken blade of the Focke-Achgelis kite after it had been torn from its moorings by a sharp gust of wind. In the seat is Squadron Leader F. J. Cable.

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