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Author Topic: Charles Tilleard Mudford - Journalist, Newspaper Proprietor, Soldier  (Read 227 times)
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Man of Kent1
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« on: March 20, 2017, 18:19:16 PM »

I coincidentally came across this chap when carrying out some research on the history of Little Barton Farm in Canterbury, a few minutes from where I live.
I was checking the 1891 Census and discovered his name had been entered as a 'Visitor', aged '19' and that his occupation was that of 'Reporter Newspaper'.  Perhaps more interestingly, in tiny writing alongside his occupation, were the words 'Trooper Royal East Kent Yeomanry' (later known as the 'Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles' or 'REKMR').
It looked promising!  I dug a little deeper and discovered that young Mudford was the son of the then proprietor of the 'Kentish Gazette', Frederick Mudford (1832 - 1913), and then went on in the early 1900's to inherit the ownership of the paper after his father retired.
Charles was a Canterbury man through and through, being born in 1872 at 52 High Street, Canterbury where he lived with his parents and siblings, two brothers and five sisters.
By 1899 he had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant in the Yeomanry and, together with ten other local men, and with the blessing of Lord Harris (Sir George Robert Canning, 4th. Baron Harris), whose regiment it was, had volunteered to serve in South Africa to fight the Boers.
(Harris had substantial business interests in South Africa, being the Chairman of Cecil Rhodes' Consolidated Goldfields Johannesburg and the South African Gold Trust, as well as a member of the Imperial South Africa Association.)

The Boer Republic had feared that the mostly white, British settlers ('Uitlanders' or 'Outsiders') were gaining too much influence over the Boer way of life in the country. To combat this the Republic had introduced severe franchise restrictions on the Uitlanders which meant that they had fewer rights than the original, Dutch settlers - a sort of white-on-white apartheid policy.
This led to the infamous 'Jameson Raid' in 1895, which had been encouraged by Cecil Rhodes himself, when around 600 'volunteers' crossed the western border of the Republic in order to effect an armed uprising against the government.
This force was, however, forced to surrender at Doornkop, about 25 miles from Johannesburg on New Year's Day, 1896. All the officers were sentenced to 1 year in prison and fined substantial amounts of money, although later allowed to serve their sentences in England.
The Boers then promised the Uitlanders concessions but, when these failed to materialise, friction arose and, eventually, some 20,000 Uitlanders petitioned Queen Victoria to resume full sovereignty over the province.
The petition was accepted and the British Government approached the Republic's government, led by Paul Kruger, to make substantial concessions.  Kruger refused and the scene was set for conflict.
Subsequent tensions along the border with the Cape Colony where Imperial troops had massed to reinforce the garrison at the Cape led to war being declared on Great Britain by the Republic on 11th. October 1899.


.......to be continued......

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Sergeant Charles Tilleard Mudford, (c.1899).JPG
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2017, 00:01:24 AM »

Men from all over the country volunteered to go and see off the Boers - it was going to be a great adventure!
The Canterbury area saw the newly promoted Sergeant Mudford put in charge of a small detachment of the REKMR formed of local men, later known as 'Lord Harris' First Eleven', including farmer's son, Trooper Ernest Arthur Sole and:
Corporal Harry Clarke
Corporal J Monkton
Corporal H Foster
Lance-Corporal George Percy Tice
Trooper A Butcher
Trooper Thomas Morgan Deverson
Trooper W A Goodhew
Trooper T B Palmer
Trooper T D Robinson

(The photo below, a screen shot, shows ten of the eleven personnel but doesn't say who is who, unfortunately.)

By the time the men arrive in Cape Town aboard RMS 'Carisbrooke Castle' on the 14 November 1899, the war had not been going very well for the British, with both Kimberley and Ladysmith being invested by over 36,000 Boer forces.
Our Canterbury 'pals' discovered that all but one squadron of the Imperial Light Horse had been shut up in Ladysmith so they decided to join up with the newly formed 'South African Light Horse' (SALH) under a Major J H G Byng, who had also been on their ship.
Among new recruits who were enlisted in South Africa were dispossessed Uitlanders together with Australians, New Zealanders and even muleteers from the USA.
Later a troop of Stellenbosch Mounted Infantry enlisted en-masse. (The SALH were known as 'Bingo's Own' and wore cock feathers in their hats.)
The SALH then became part of Lord Dundonald's Mounted Brigade, together with 1st Royal Dragoons, 13th Hussars, Bethune's Mounted Infantry, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry and a Composite Regiment of Mounted Infantry.
This brigade in turn then formed part of Redvers Buller's Ladysmith Relief Force.


.......to be continued..........(Photo: Kent and Sharpshooters Yeomanry Trust)

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Ten Of The REKMR Contingent Prior To Sailing To S. Africa.jpg
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2017, 09:41:08 AM »

On 30th November 1899, Dundonald's Brigade advanced northwards, on their way to relieve Ladysmith, reaching the outskirts of Colenso by mid-December.
The SALH were given the task of capturing Hlangwane Hill which overlooked the town.  Despite bravely battling up the slopes, supported by mounted infantry on each flank, they met such fierce resistance that they were forced to retire, discovering that they were heavily outnumbered.  The British then made a humiliating withdrawal after failing to reach their objectives at Hlangwane and the River Tugela.
Because of the heavy losses incurred, Buller was forced to wait for reinforcements from a newly arrived division under Sir Charles Warren.
It was during this period that the SALH were joined by a new officer, Winston Randolph Churchill!
Churchill was by now famous for his escape from Boer captivity after the armoured train on which he was riding was ambushed by the Boers.
Hostilities were renewed in early 1900 when the Boers attacked Ladysmith in force but, threatened by Buller's forces, they soon retreated.
Later the British crossed the Little Tugela River using a bridge which was found intact before moving on the big Tugela which they crossed using a ferry.
Buller's force then reached the area of Spion Kop and a detachment of the SALH under a Major Childe were ordered to reconnoitre another feature nearby called Bastion Hill.
With a penchant for underestimating their enemy, the SALH were soon in trouble!

.....to be continued...............
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John
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2017, 17:05:55 PM »

I hope I'm not mucking up your topic, but I thought this would be an ideal spot to jump in with the first of several newspaper articles - this way, it keeps things in chronological order and, hopefully, helps to expand on your narrative.




Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 16 December 1899

THE EAST KENT YEOMANRY DETACHMENT AT THE FRONT. ANOTHER INTERESTING COMMUNICATION FROM SERGEANT MUDFORD. THE TROOPERS AGREED TO BE SEPARATED AND WERE ATTACHED TO DIFFERENT SQUADRONS OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN LIGHT HORSE.

By the mail which arrived on Friday we have received a further communication from Sergeant C. T. Mudford, who went out to South Africa in command of the detachment of the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles. Writing on post cards in a train proceeding from Capetown up country, on November 30, the Sergeant says:-

On our arrival at Capetown we learnt, as you already know, that we could not join the Imperial Light Horse, as that corps is in Ladysmith cut off. We were strongly advised, therefore, to enlist in the South African Light Horse, and we all did so. The Colonel commanding was pleased so have us, and offered to put us all in one squadron (D), or split us up among A, B, and C squadrons, and as A and B squadrons were expected to go to the front first, we agreed to be separated. I, Clarke, Tice, and Sole were attached to No. 3 troop A squadron. I am sergeant of the troop. Munckton, Foster, Robinson, and Butcher went to B squadron; Deverson, Goodhew, and Palmer to D squadron. A troop consists of a lieutenant in command, a sergeant, and twenty men. We have very nice officers, and are well cared for. Sunday, the 19th, at 1 p.m., we had orders for A squadron to entrain at 3 o'clock to proceed to the front. We had our work cut out to do it in time. We are now off, and I am writing this in the train. We believe we are on the way to Richmond Road - a place some forty miles this side of De Aar junction - to escort General Buller. Others are to follow. We are armed with the Lee Metford rifle only. We have drawn our horses, which are mostly buck jumpers, and we amused ourselves on Sunday morning by trying them. Muncktun is, I believe, a corporal in his troop. By being split up in different squadrons we shall have a better chance of promotion. We are only allowed to take kit to the amount of 7lbs., so we have left most of our belongings at Capetown. B and C squadrons will, I expect, come up after us some time this week. D squadron will take at least another fortnight to prepare. As I have said, the short notice we received on Sunday gave us mighty hard work, but that seems to agree with us. Half our horses had not been ridden before. Our address for the present will be - "South African Light Horse, Squadron —, vid Capetown." Ten minutes after we enlisted we were sent three miles out to bring back twenty-five horses, mostly unbroken, and having only halters on them, so you can imagine there was some fun. On Friday I took six men into Capetown, six miles from Rose Bank - our camp - to fetch ammunition, so we were pretty busy, to say nothing of drills, guard, etc. Our hours have been from 5 a.m. till 6.30 p.m. We entrained Sunday afternoon, and shall not reach our destination till Tuesday morning. Our experiences are various and amusing, but we are all very chummy, and have thus far been doing quite splendidly.
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 17:21:17 PM »

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald - Saturday 17 February 1900

LETTER FROM SERGT. MUDFORD.
Sergeant Mudford, of the South African Light Horse, in a letter to the "Kentish Observer," Canterbury, of which he is the proprietor, written at Chieveley Camp, on January 12th, relates how Trooper Palmer, of Mersham, escaped at the battle of Colenso. He says:

"Our fellows did exceedingly well in the last fight. Palmer was taken prisoner, but as he shammed sunstroke, the Boers would have nothing to do with him, and when they left him he got up and rode in. They (Palmer and chums) all wear bandoliers now - one, round the waist, which they captured from the Boers. Palmer is also riding one of the enemy's horses. They say they were all right lying down, though they could not see a sign of a Boer, but once they commenced to retire, the hail of bullets was tremendous, and then it was that our soldiers commenced to drop."

Describing work at the front, Sergt. Mudford continues,

"With four others, I have just paid a visit to a farmhouse. We found it deserted by all save a dog and a pig. However, we helped ourselves to peaches and pomegranates, and then retired to a high kopje overlooking the farm, and here we formed a Cossack post. This is a very exciting sort of work, and suits us all splendidly. With the exception of Foster and Goodhew, both of whom are in hospital with slight attacks of fever, we are all fit and well, and hope to be in Ladysmith shortly."
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2017, 00:12:45 AM »

That's very useful, additional info, John, thanks!

To continue with the attack on the 19th January.....

The small SALH contingent reached the top of the hill and surprised a small group of Boers who promptly scarpered, leaving the Brits in possession.
However, the Boers knew their ground much better because the SALH soon realised, to their horror, that the enemy had possession of a nearby ridge which was higher than Bastion Hill, and they had artillery with them! They quickly started shelling Bastion Hill, killing the unfortunate Major Childe in the process.
Despite this, the SALH managed to hold their position until evening when they were relieved by the infantry.

I'm afraid that I'll have to continue this anon as the next bit is quite a long report to type out and its getting late. ( I will be writing about our Sgt. Mudford's remarkable exploits on the battlefield.)  Thank you for your patience!...................................

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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2017, 00:20:21 AM »

The East Kent of the SALH contingent were also involved in daring exploits that day, as described in an account from a lieutenant of 'A' Squadron at Chieveley Camp, and later published in Mudford's own newspaper:

'This is a full account of the reconnaissance made on January 19 by two troops of that squadron, included in which were Sgt.-Major C T Mudford and three other members of the Royal East Kent Yeomanry, part of a detachment which left Canterbury at the end of October and joined the South Africa Light Horse.
It was in this encounter with the Boers that Capt. de Rougemont was mortally wounded and six ment of 'A' Squadron were taken prisoners.
It appears that the object of the reconnaissance was to discover if there [was] any of the enemy on the Southern side of the Tugela, and also if Robinson's Drift was fordable or not.  To do this, the men in the centre had to advance down a gentle slope of about two thousand yards to the river, with absolutely no cover, and commanded by the trenches on the opposite bank.
Corporal Harry Clarke and Sergt.-Major Mudford raced down this closely followed by Lance Corporal Tice and Trooper Sole, all members of the East Kent Yeomanry Contingent.
Corpl. Clarke was the first there, found the bank one mass of barbed wire, succeeded in getting through it, rode into the river and found the ford impassable.
When he got back into the river the enemy opened fire at about 200 yards.  He ascertained their position, galloped back wit Tice and Sole to the Officer Commanding and made his report, returning again to the river bank.
By this time the whole of the enemy were engaged pouring deadly crossfire from the trenches on the right and left.  15 men in all were on the banks of the river. They sought the friendly shelter of a few stunted bushes and for upwards of three hours lay there firing at whatever opportunity offered itself. The enemy's heliograph began working but was quickly shifted by Clarke's accurate shooting.
Sgt.-Major Mudford's behaviour under this awful fire is described by the lieutenant as extremely plucky.  Although within a 100 [yards] of the trenches, he walked from man to man, encouraging and chatting to each.  At last he gave the order to retire.  Clarke got his three men together, reached their horses and started to mount.  Sole got up all right, Tice's stirrup leather broke and deposited him on his back half stunned but with Clarke's help he got up and they started up the hill.
One man had his rifle shot out of his hand; Tice's hat got shot off; Sole lost his but, marvellous to relate, no one was touched.
Tice rode up the hill minus reins and stirrups, Clarke keeping his horse straight for him.
On reaching the top where the Welsh Fus[iliers] were they were warmly shaken by the hand and congratulated on their luck by everyone.
Sgt.-Major Mudford got his horse but, finding that six of his men did not come out, he rushed back to look for them.  Shouting out their names but getting no answer he mounted his horse.  Then the bullets hailed all round him but still he rode on.
Everyone watched breathlessly, expecting to see him fall at every moment.  The General shouted 'he'll be killed'.  'Not he Sir' answered, answered Clarke, they can't hit the East Kent.  Eventually the Sgt.-Major reached his companions in safety, not sustaining a scratch.  The party then rode back to camp but
, adds the writer, we were sad at heart when we learned that one of our officers and six of our best men were reported missing.'
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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2017, 00:44:28 AM »

After many other battles and skirmishes, including the disaster at Spion Kop, Buller's forces eventually managed to relieve Ladysmith.
The SALH, including the men of the EKY, went on to play their part in numerous other actions all over South Africa, resulting in promotions, Corporals Clarke, Foster and Monckton to Sergeant and Sergeant Mudford to Sergt.-Major.
By the end of 1900 it was time for the East Kent men to return home but, sadly, Trooper Sole of Wickhambreaux, near Canterbury died of enteric fever at Standerton.
The courageous, and very lucky, Trooper Tice decided to stay on in South Africa after being offered a commission in the South Africa Mounted Irregular Forces (SAMIF).  He went on to serve in the Prince of Wales Light Horse and by 1902 was a Captain in the 9th.Bn. Imperial Yeomanry.
The remaining personnel sailed back on the RMS 'Medic', finally arriving by train at Canterbury on the 8 December 1900 where they were given a warm welcome by the Deputy Mayor and Lord Harris and a full military band.
Later, Sgt.-Major Mudford attended a service at Canterbury Cathedral before going to the Guildhall to be presented with the Honorary Freedom of the City of Canterbury.
Sgt.-Major Charles Tilleard Mudford was also awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his courage and leadership.
He then resumed his occupation of proprietor of the 'Kentish Gazette' and went in search of a wife.......................

..to be continued.................
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« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2017, 08:36:41 AM »

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald - Saturday 15 December 1900

RETURN OF THE EAST KENT MOUNTED RIFLES. A GRAND RECEPTION AT CANTERBURY. SIR R. BULLER'S PRAISE.
As we intimated in our last issue was likely to be the case, an enthusiastic reception was accorded at Canterbury on Monday to Sergeant-Major Mudford and his comrades of the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles, just returned from South Africa, where they have served for upwards of twelve months in the South African Light Horse. The men arrived at Canterbury West at five minutes after eleven on Monday morning, and were received on the platform by the Sheriff, the Deputy-Mayor, and the ex-Mayor, loud cheers being raised by a large number of citizens assembled both inside and outside of the station. Drawn up in the roadway opposite the station was the regiment of Yeomanry to which the men belong, under the command of Colonel Lord Harris, and the band of the 7th Royal Dragoon Guards from Shorncliffe was in attendance. On the Sergeant-Major and his men emerging from the station, they saluted the regiment, and the salute was returned. Three cheers were then given for the Queen, three for Colonel Byng, and the South African Light Horse, and three for Sergeant-Major Mudford and his comrades.

There was an immense concourse of people assembled in the station yard, who cheered vociferously as the procession started for the Cathedral. Earl Stanhope, Lord Lieutenant of Kent, was in a carriage wih the ex-Mayor. Sergeant-Major Mudford and his men walked behind the band, and then came the Yeomanry Regiment. The route to the Cathedral yard was thickly lined with people, and many of the houses were decorated. At the great west door Lord Stanhope was introduced to the Sergeant-Major and his men by Lord Harris, and shook hands with each. A short thanksgving service was held in the nave, after which Dean Farrar welcomed the returned warriors, and the Archbishop then delivered an address. His Grace spoke in terms of grateful recognition of the value of their services to the country and of the honour they had brought to the County of Kent.

Subsequently, at the ancient Guildhall, Sergeant-Major Mudford and his men were presented with the honorary freedom of the city. The Mayor (Mr. Alderman Hart), in addressing them, mentioned that the honorary freedom had been conferred on only a few persons during the last 500 or 600 years, the recipients of the honour including William Pitt, George IV., Lord Tenterden, and, quite recently, Mr. Henniker Heaton, M.P. The Mayor then read the following letter he had received from Sir R. Buller:-

"7th December.

Dear Sir, - I believe that the idea of sending out Yeomanry to South Africa originated in the fact that the men of the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles, whose return you are about to celebrate, were mentioned by me in a telegram I sent home. I was telegraphing regarding the need there was for more mounted men, and mentioned that in the South African Light Horse, one of the irregular corps then under my command, there were some East Yeomen. Practically, therefore, the gallant fellows whose return you are about to celebrate were the pioneers of that great movement. As for the South African Light Horse, there is no corps that has done better or had harder work to do, and when I say that I give, I think, as high praise as it is possible to give.

Yours faithfully,

Redvers Buller."


Sergeant-Major Mudford replied on behalf of himself and his comrades. He said they had simply tried to do their duty, and it was a matter of great gratification to them to find that their work had been so highly appreciated.

The Ex-Mayor (Mr. Alderman Collard) next congratulated the newly-made freemen, and mentioned that one of the eleven who went out - Trooper Tice - had been given a commission in the South African Irregular Forces. Earl Stanhope then addressed the company, mentioning that the County of Kent had sent something like 1,200 Volunteers to South Africa to take part in the war.

Lord Harris, speaking subsequently, said that fourteen months since he was doing everything he could to conceal the fact of these men wanting to go to South Africa for fear that the War Office would stop them. Having been unsuccessful in obtaining the sanction of the military authorities to their being sent out, the only thing to do was for them to "go on their own." It was curious to look back to that now, knowing that in the meantime there had been such a demand for that class of soldier, the mounted rifleman. After a year's experience of the Imperial Yeomanry, the Secretary of State had appointed a Committee to consider the organization of the Yeomanry and various other matters. That might be taken as indicating that the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa very highly appreciated the services that had been rendered by the Imperial Yeomanry, recognised the great advantages of mounted riflemen, and foresaw the necessity of improving the Yeomanry force and of enlarging it. As chairman of that committee, he would endeavour to impress on his colleagues the necessity of remembering that the class which had for more than one hundred years maintained this Yeomanry force in face of scant assistance and some derision, the class which would continue to maintain that force, and which would be for all time the backbone of the Mounted Rifles in this country, was the agricultural men, the country gentlemen, yeomen and rural tradesmen, men who always had a horse at hand, and knew how to use it. That was the class on which the Yeomanry would always have to depend, and the demands of service in the Yeomanry would have to depend on the time which these men could conveniently give to the country without interfering with their ordinary business. Referring to the letter of General Buller, Lord Harris said there was not the least doubt that the formation of the Imperial Yeomanry was due to the telegram Sir Redvers sent to the War Office, in which he praised the detachment of the East Kent Yeomanry that had joined the South African Light Horse.

At the conclusion of the proceedings in the Guildhall, a public luncheon was given in the Corn Exchange, under the presidency of the Mayor who was supported by Earl Stanhope, Lord Harris, Captain Howard, M.P., Colonel Hegan, Colonel Kelly, and a large number of ladies and gentlemen residing in the county. In the evening a smoking concert was held in the same building.
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« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2017, 09:06:44 AM »

I'm glad you typed that lot out, John, thank you!  Grin
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« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2017, 18:53:13 PM »

Decorated war hero, a good, secure job as proprietor of 'The Kentish Gazette', his own, long-established, popular and well-respected local newspaper, and a Freeman of Canterbury - what more could a gal ask for!
It didn't take that long: 29-year-old Charles Mudford's entry in the 1901 Census shows him lurking with intent, once again as a 'Visitor', at 'The Parsonage', Nackington Road, Canterbury, the home of Mr & Mrs George Mount and family, including one Ellen Adeline Mount (1880 - 1961), then aged 21. The Mounts at that time were well-established farmers in the area.
The 'society' wedding between Ellen and her paramour, Charles, took place on 11 February, 1902 at St. Mary's Church, Nackington and was attended by the great and the good from the Canterbury area.  A quick run-through of the wedding guest list shows Mounts galore; loads of various Collards, including the Mayor of Canterbury, Mr George Collard, and including those members of the family who once farmed at Little Barton Farm where Charles had stayed in 1891!; a Mowll, a member of the family which produced local coroners, and solicitors, as indeed they are still today in Dover.  (In fact the very amiable and very competent water-colourist, Ben Mowll, is my own solicitor!).
Charles, resplendent in his uniform of a Sergeant-Major in the REKMR, was accompanied by his elder brother acting as best man, Captain William Mudford of the 3rd London Rifles.
Charles proudly wore his South Africa and Distinguished Conduct medals, and the bride and groom left the church under a row of crossed swords formed by a contingent of the Yeomanry under the command of Quarter-Master Sergeant Palmer, presumably the one-time Trooper T B Palmer who had once sailed to South Africa with Mudford and the rest of the Canterbury volunteers in late 1899.
(Among the many fine wedding gifts to the happy couple was a pair of silver candlesticks from Lord Harris.)

(Ah, despite the fact that it was February and probably freezing, I wish I'd been there with my trusty Lumix G1 to record everything in full colour!)

Mudford didn't hang about - his daughter, Evelyn Tilleard Mudford, was born the following year and the future looked rosy for everyone, but something odd happened next which seemed to prove the contrary; unless I'm reading too much into it!

.........to be continued......
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« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2017, 23:57:41 PM »

So what did happen next?  Why, by 1911, was Charles Mudford, then with his in-laws in one part of Bournemouth, living apart from his wife who resided in another part of the town?
George Mount was described this time as a 'Farm Manager', seemingly a bit of a come-down for a man who once had a big farm and many employees.
Mudford himself was still a journalist but with which publication I do not know.
His wife, in the meantime, was described in the Census as a 'Boarding House Manager' for a large establishment in a leafy part of Bournemouth, living there with her 7-year-old daughter, Evelyn, various staff and guests.
To me this doesn't sound like the life that either of them had planned when they got married.
Whatever the reason I then discovered that Charles died aged only 43 on the 7 July 1915 at an address in the same road as his wife's boarding house.  I haven't sent for his death certificate, as that costs money, but I'm intrigued as to the cause of his demise.  I haven't managed to find anything about his estate, or any obituary as yet.
The widowed Evelyn passed away on the 7 June 1961 in Poole, Dorset, leaving the sum of £2,899. 4s. 5d., with Administration granted to her by now married daughter and another person.
It all seems a little strange!

If anyone wishes to add anything to this story I'd be very pleased to hear about it!
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« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2017, 08:24:04 AM »

Very interesting post, MoK, and his death in July 1915 doesn't seem to have attracted any newspaper interest, or none that I can find so far... ......

This newspaper article from January 1915 has the title "Deed of Arrangement" - my very limited knowledge of this type of law indicates that he may well have been in financial difficulty :

Western Gazette - Friday 01 January 1915

DEED OF ARRANGEMENT

From Kemp's Mercantile Gazette
HANTS. - Chas. Tilliard Mudford, Chesterwood, Grove-road, Bournemouth, boarding-house, proprietor. Trustee, F.J. Webb, 1 Yelverton-road, BOURNEMOUTH, accountant.  Secured creditors, £128.
SOMERSET - Geo. Handford, Union Gate and 42, East Reach, Taunton, builder.  Trustee, J. E. Goodland, Taunton, C. A.. Secured creditors, £214.
_____________________________________________

I don't think that the 'Hants' and 'Somerset' bits of the article are linked, but they appear in the same article so I've typed it all just in case.  I'll keep looking through the newspapers.

There is only one will published in 1915 with the last name "Mudford" and that is in January and it is Thomas Michael Mudford - so isn't your man.  Are you certain he died in 1915 ?
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« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2017, 09:40:28 AM »

That's a great piece of info, Craggs, thank you!  I, too, had trouble finding out stuff about Charles!
Not only does it appear that Charles had run into trouble financially but it also indicates that he may have actually owned the boarding house that his wife managed, which is something that hadn't occurred to me until now.
Regarding his death, I've had it confirmed by accessing another 'Ancestry' entry by a member of the Mount family.  I sent a PM to this person a few weeks ago to give her the address where he died, which she hadn't got on her family tree, and she acknowledged my contribution.
I'm also wondering if he may have been quite ill for some time prior to his death.
It does seem a sad ending to my story!
I'd appreciate any more help anyone can give.
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« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2017, 09:45:47 AM »

Here is another photograph of C.T. Mudford.

This is from the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 09 February 1946

There are a number of references over the years that show Charles Tilleard Mudford was the proprietor of the Kentish Gazette and his publisher was Edward Henry Elvy.  Mudford's name doesn't appear in the newspaper too often but Edward Henry Elvy appears very frequently as the publisher.  He died in 1927 but his sons continued to publish the newspaper.  A search of the newspaper archives show that the Elvy Brothers held a large ceremony at their newspaper offices to honour Councillor H.F.T. Davey who printed the first newspaper in Whitstable.  The  Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 09 February 1946  describes the ceremony and gives reference to the previous owners, proprietors and publishers.

The newspaper article is very big so I won't type it all at the moment - and it strays off topic quite a lot - but this is what was printed about Charles Mudford :

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 09 February 1946


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