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Author Topic: Chailey Heritage Craft School for crippled boys  (Read 4950 times)
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John
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« on: February 03, 2012, 21:13:21 PM »

Information below from the National Archives.
The Heritage Craft Schools and Hospitals for Crippled Children were established in the former parish workhouse (later known as the Boys' or Old Heritage) in 1903 by Grace Kimmins and her friend Alice Rennie. The Heritage was an offshoot of the Guild of the Brave Poor Things, founded in London in 1894 and from small beginnings it expanded to include the Girls' (later New) Heritage (1908, with later additions for babies and toddlers) and St George's Building for ambulant boys (1932). The basic work of the Heritage was with orthopaedic cases, who were given hospital treatment, education and training in craftwork. Much of the philosophy derived from Grace Kimmins's husband, Dr C W Kimmins, who was an educational psychologist for the London County Council. (d.1948)

As a private institution until 1948, the Heritage had to remain flexible in order to meet new demands and to secure funds. During the first world war the Princess Louise Military Orthopaedic Hospital was established with funding from the military authorities and the St Nicholas and Botches Homes for Raid-Shock children attracted donations. After the war many ex-servicemen's children were admitted under the auspices of the United Services Fund and, with the development at Chailey of open-air nursing, there was a scheme for the treatment of cases of tuberculosis, rickets, marasmus, asthma and orthopaedic conditions on behalf of East Sussex County Council. For a period during the second world war the hospital was requisitioned for the Emergency Medical Service and work with 'blitzed babes' was once again undertaken. Grace Kimmins was a tireless and inventive fund-raiser, securing patronage of royalty and the aristocracy, as well as of affluent businessmen and the press. The buildings at Chailey were mainly financed through appeals or as gifts from individuals. Several of these benefactors were made members of the governing body. The chairman of the board of governors for many years was the Rev J Scott Lidgett, Warden of the Bermondsey Settlement, and the President of the Heritage was the Bishop of London, Arthur Winnington-Ingram, who paid an annual visit to Chailey and to its 'Marine Hospital' Branch, which existed at Bishopstone between 1924 and 1939.

During the period before the hospital became part of the NHS in 1948 its records are sketchy and there are gaps in coverage. This is partly because many of the decisions were taken by Grace Kimmins, without reference either to the governors or to the medical staff, who were mainly honorary, non-resident officers. There was a small administrative and clerical staff but legal work was carried out by Lithgow and Pepper, a London firm of solicitors, and for much of the period Cassleton Elliott acted as honorary auditor, with responsibility for financial administration. Architectural design work was carried out by J Ninian Comper and his son Sebastian, with the less prestige projects being undertaken by L Keir Hett of Searle and Searle. Grace Kimmins undertook the role of Secretary and Chief Administrator (in addition to her designation as 'The Founder' or 'The Commandant') until 1946 when, at the age of 76, she was edged out to make way for a professional hospital administrator. But she continued to live at Chailey and to be involved in the school until her death in 1954. The illustrated book Heritage Chailey 1903-1948, London 1948, is her record of the institution. She became a DBE in 1950.

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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2012, 09:34:45 AM »

A few photos of Bishopstone hospital on my Tidemills site http://tidemills.webs.com/chaileyhospital.htm. A very harsh regime there- no heating in the entire building except an open fire in the Nurses home. The boys were given seawater baths most of the year round, film exists of bed ridden kids being dunked on bedsprings in the water. The footings of the buildings still remain along the beach
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Kevsussex
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2012, 21:13:14 PM »

When the establishment moved down to Chailey in 1903 there was a suggestion that it be called "the Sussex School of Crippledom" (Honest!)
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2012, 12:59:52 PM »

View of The Chailey Marine Hospital at Tidemills. 18 November 194, buildings mainly intact Hospital A, Nurses home B Village C . Note the rows of Dragon's Teeth.

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BobH
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 14:24:25 PM »

I was a patient at the New Heritage Hospital, Chailey, East Sussex 23/04/1948 to 16/09/1949. I was born August 1945 so I don't remember anything at all about the place.  From reading the above article I must have been there when is was the NHS.  My surgeon was Mr Harold Jackson Burrows who was based at St Bartholomew's, City of London and a friend of the founder. All that remains of the site is the old St Helen's Chapel which I think is being restored into a community centre for the new estate which sites on the old site.  The chapel was designed and built by L Keir Hett. I have a photograph of it from the days that I was there. The name St Helen's stemmed from the hospital being the Girl's Heritage School before it became a small general orthopaedic hospital.
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2013, 23:35:25 PM »

Were you dunked in seawater, Bob?
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BobH
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« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2013, 09:39:28 AM »

I don't remember as I was too young.  Maybe I was though, as I have always had the fear of water i.e. I cannot swim.
I have been told that I used to sleep under the stars outside under a veranda.  
Here is the photo of the Chapel I mentioned earlier. Sorry I got in the way!

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« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2013, 10:09:58 AM »

Were you dunked in seawater, Bob?

There were 2 sites, Chailey, north of Lewes , the main hospital that BobH refers to and the Marine at Tidemills
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John
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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2013, 13:10:10 PM »

Was the pdf displayed correctly or should have been a jpg?
When I view the post all I see is a file attachment - no image.

Hi Bob, it would have to be an image file such as BMP, JPG etc to display.

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BobH
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« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2013, 21:27:53 PM »

Following on from my earlier comments when I stated that I didn't remember anything about my time at the New Heritage site (old girls school). I left there on 16/09/1949 being just over 4 years of age and the strange thing is that I can remember part of my journey home.  My parents had a motorcycle combination and somewhere on this journey to Bexleyheath we crossed a huge amount (or what seemed huge to me) of road works with mounds of soil being moved around. How I could only remember this part has always seemed strange to me and I have since wondered if these earthworks were building of the roads around Gatwick Airport.  Do the dates fit or is this just imagination on my part?  Would this have been the route taken in those times?
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« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2013, 23:12:46 PM »

BobH

I think you would have been further east than Gatwick the most logical route would have been up to Crowborough then Tunbridge Wells.
Devolepment of Gatwick didn't start until the mid 50s - I know journeytimes were longer in those days but.....
I can't find a road on your route being constructed at that time Sidcup bypass was 1935ish, Tonbridge 1960s, Sevenoaks 1970s



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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2013, 19:18:37 PM »

It has been a couple of years since I visited the site of the NHS Hospital (former New Heritage Girls School Site) and wondered if anybody knows what progress may have been made in the change of use of St Helen's Chapel as seen in one of my earlier posts.  I believe it was to become a community centre for the new housing estate built on the site.

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tallstory
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« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2014, 15:43:36 PM »

Thought these might be of interest. They come from the "Sussex County Magazine" volume 6 of 1932, pages 456 to 459. Sorry they are not very good but it is so difficult to scan bound books  Sad

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John
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« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2014, 17:15:11 PM »

Sussex Agricultural Express - Friday 05 April 1929

CHAILEY SCHOOLS FOR CRIPPLES.

An appeal is made to the nation and to the people of Sussex in particular, for £25,000 to rebuild the Kitchener huts of the Heritage Craft Schools for Crippled Children at Chailey, as a thankoffering for the recovery of the King. Over £400,000 has been spent by the Heritage during its 25 years’ existence, irrespective of sums given for speciai buildings. During the war 590 raid-shocked children were housed, and 540 wounded soldiers accommodated, while 56 wounded soldier-pensioners were admitted to the hospital. Cheques and donations should be sent to the Honorary Treasurer, the Heritage Craft Schools, Chailey.
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« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2018, 13:11:56 PM »

The Sketch - Wednesday 11 July 1945

THE QUEEN AT THE CHAILEY PADDLING POOL

THE QUEEN was obviously delighted at the scene presented by the Toddlers' Paddling Pool when she visited the Heritage Craft Schools at Chailey, saw the home for blitzed babies which bears her name, and inspected the wards and workshops where the children receive treatment to straighten their crippled limbs and bodies, and learn trades and handicrafts. Our group includes PRINCESS ELIZABETH and PRINCESS MARGARET and MRS. KIMMINS, founder of the schools, who is standing just behind their Royal Highnesses.

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