Author Topic: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..  (Read 4947 times)

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Offline John

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #30 on: January 30, 2020, 05:38:37 am »
Thanet Advertiser - Tuesday 23 November 1943

BIGAMOUS MARRIAGE SEQUEL

Sentence of five months' imprisonment was passed at Kent Assizes last week on Rose Mary Ward, aged 30, a corporal in the W.A.A.F., who was committed for trial by Margate magistrates on a charge of bigamy.

Defendant also admitted that she had fraudulently obtained £225 11s. from the Postmaster General by falsely representing that she was the wife of a man named Basil John Alien, whom she bigamously married before he joined the Army.

Miss D. Dix, for the prosecution, said accused was married at Battersea when she was 18 and had two children, who were now in the care of a foster-mother. She parted from her husband in 1939 and lived n rooms with the man Allen before they went through a form of marriage at Hendon on 14th May, 1940. She once asked her husband to divorce her, but he said he could not afford to. According to a statement accused made to the police, Allen knew she was already married and had two children, and he asked her to "marry" him before he was called up so that she could draw a separation allowance.

The judge commented "Not only does she defy the law so far as bigamy is concerned, but to swindle the country."

D/I Cory, of Margate, said accused had no allowance from her husband, who was also in the forces.

Mr. B. H. Waddy, defending, submitted that accused had not done any injustice to either man. So far as the allowance was concerned she would almost certainly have been entitled to the same amount from the State as Allen's unmarried "wife."

In passing sentence, Mr. Justice Charles said in that case the bigamous marriage was committed in order to get an allowance, and it could not be overlooked.
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell

Offline Craggs

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2020, 08:50:54 am »

This isn't a nice way to treat your husband who is away fighting the war.... !


Hastings and St Leonards Observer - Saturday 08 July 1922

HASTINGS BIGAMY CHARGE

AT THE ASSIZES YESTERDAY.


At the East Sussex Assizes yesterday (Friday), Charlotte Hilda Bent, 26, needleworker, was brought on a charge having on the 1st December, 1919, at Hastings, committed bigamy with Sydney Parker.

The prisoner pleaded guilty.

Mr. Flowers, for the prosecution, stated that prisoner was married on the 27th of October, 1913, and lived with her husband until he joined the Army. He went to France in 1915, and apparently corresponded with her until 1916, when he said he had no replies. When he was demobilised in April, 1919, he was unable to find her. It was then found that on the 1st of December, 1919, she went through the form of marriage with Sydney Parker at Hastings. It was obvious she could not have believed her husband was dead, because in 1920 when the police were making inquiries about her drawing a separation allowance she said she thought was still living.

Mr. Reeve, for the defence, said the prisoner first of all pleaded not guilty but after hearing the evidence that was brought against her at the Police Court she had, on his advice, pleaded guilty. She instructed him to tell his Lordship that at one time she thought her husband was dead. He suggested that with regard to the second marriage there was not much harm done. She had been in gaol since the 8th of April.

His Lordship said the prisoner had committed a very serious offence as she must have known perfectly well that her husband was alive when she married this man. She had already been in prison not quite four months, and the sentence of the court was that she should be imprisoned for two days, which meant she would be released at the rising of the court.

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2020, 10:35:15 am »
Charlotte Hilda Bent

See marriage cert. To Walter Edward Bent

Walter was in  Lancashire Fusiliers, Salford Battalion, No 13110 & 478475(Labour Corps?). Born 1895 Lancaster.
A Warehouseman when he enlisted 27.10.1914. He had a series of punishments Including a Court Martial for desertion.
He served abroad (The record is in very poor condition, so cannot see where) Dieppe? 

Offline Pete

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #33 on: August 09, 2020, 09:40:40 am »
At the Kent Assizes, at Maidstone, on Saturday, John Joseph D. Roylance, 27, ship's steward, said to be highly connected, pleaded guilty to bigamy at Stone. A sister of the first wife stated that Mrs. Roylance was compelled to leave the prisoner because of his ill-treatment. The prisoner alleged that his first wife had committed adultery, but this was strongly denied by the witness. His lordship said that the prisoner had ruined one young woman, and now wanted to ruin his first wife by making a cruel charge against her. This statement greatly aggravated the case, and he would be sentenced to two years' hard labour. The prisoner fainted on hearing the sentence, and had to be carried from the dock

Cardigan Observer 6 June 1896
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Offline Craggs

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2022, 08:43:30 am »
Two soldiers stationed at Dover in WWI, not connected in any way except for the nature of the offence committed, appeared before the Kent Assizes at Maidstone in November 1941.   

Private William James Gregory bigamously married Miss Mary Elizabeth Anne Turner at Dover in March 1941.

Private Charles William Weekes bigamously married Miss Ruth Margaret Ware in Dover in September 1941.   

Their respective sentences, handed down by Mr. Justice Charles, are both announced in the same newspaper article, which I have transcribed and posted last.  Here are newspaper articles published about Private Gregory and then others about Private Weekes - and the last one, with the title in the plural - DOVER SOLDIERS' BIGAMY. - is mainly about Weekes but included Gregory's sentence.


Firstly, Private William Gregory.  He opens his account by actually publishing a notice about the fact that he got married !


Dover Express - Friday 07 March 1941    (extract from the "Births, Deaths and Marriages" column)

GREGORY—TURNER.—On March 1st, 1941, at St. Andrew's Church, Dover, by the Rev. G. J. Browne, Lance-Corporal William James Gregory, eldest son of Mr. W. Gregory, of Newcastle, to Mary E. A. Turner, second daughter Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Turner, of 76, Glenfield Rd., Dover.


Dover Express - Friday 26 September 1941

BIGAMY CHARGE.

At the Dover Police Court on Monday, before Messrs. W. L. Law, C. E. Beaufoy and H. T. Hawksfield.

William James Gregory, a soldier, was charged that on March 1st, 1941, at St. Andrew's Church, Buckland, he did marry and take to wife Mary Elizabeth Ann Turner, his former wife, Elsie, whom he married on June 8th, 1935, being then alive.

Inspector McLeod asked for a remand for a week, and this was granted.


Dover Express - Friday 03 October 1941

DOVER BIGAMY CHARGE.

At the Dover Police Court, on Monday, before Messrs. W. L. Law, C. E. Beaufoy and H. T. Hawksfield and Mrs. Morecroft, William James Gregory, a soldier, was charged with bigamously marrying Mary Elizabeth Ann Turner on 1st March, 1941.

Mr. S. R. H. Loxton (Town Clerk), prosecuting, said that the first marriage appeared to be far from happy, and the parties separated in January, 1938. Prisoner was recalled to the Army on the outbreak of war, and married Miss Turner at Dover. The bigamy came to light as the result the second wife not being able get proper marriage allowances.

Mrs. Elsie Gregory, of 56, Davidson St., Gateshead, said that prisoner was her husband. They were married on June 8th, 1935, at St. Aidan's Church, Gateshead. There was one child of the marriage. They parted on January 8th, 1938, and as she got no money from prisoner, she obtained a maintenance order in January, 1940.

Norman Moncur Heslop, of 119, Davidson Street, Gateshead, brother of the previous witness, said that he was the best man at the wedding, and signed the marriage register as a witness.

Mary Elizabeth Ann Turner, of 76, Glenfield Road, Dover, said that towards the end of 1940 she met prisoner, and they walked out together for a while. At about Christmas time they decided to marry in June, but in March he returned to Dover on a few days' leave, and they decided to marry then, and went through a form of marriage on 1st March at St. Andrew's Church. They were married by special licence. Her brother and sister witnessed the marriage. Subsequently witness had correspondence with prisoner about allowances. Prisoner sent a letter to her brother at the beginning of June.

Charles Alfred Turner, of 4, MacDonald Road, Dover, brother of the previous witness, gave evidence of witnessing the form of marriage through which his sister went with prisoner. Witness wrote to prisoner asking for a statement as to the true facts, and received reply in June.

Detective Constable Haynes said that at 7.10 am. on September 20th he saw prisoner detained on warrant in Yorkshire. When Charged, said, "All right." Prisoner was then charged, and reserved his defence. He was committed for trial at the Assizes at Maidstone.

An officer asked if the prisoner could be allowed legal aid as there were a number of points he wanted raise at the trial.

Mr. Loxton said that the police had no objection to bail. The prisoner was allowed bail and legal aid.

________________________________

It is unfortunate that I cannot find a newspaper account of the "number of points he wanted to raise at trial". 

We now move on to Private Charles William Weekes.



Dover Express - Friday 31 October 1941

ALLEGED BIGAMY.

At the Dover Police Court on Friday last, before Messrs. S. J. Livings, C. W. Chitty and W. G. Jeffery, Charles William Weekes, soldier, was charged with bigamously marrying Ruth Margaret Ware, at Dover, on September 8th, 1941.

On the application the Acting Chief Constable (Chief Inspector Saddleton), the defendant was remanded in custody until Monday, November 3rd.



Dover Express - Friday 07 November 1941

SOLDIER CHARGED WITH BIGAMY.

COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.


At the Dover Police Court, Monday, before Messrs. W. G. Jeffery and S. J. Livings, Mrs. Morecroft and Mrs. Binge, Charles William Weekes, a soldier, stationed at Dover, was charged, on remand, with bigamously marrying Ruth Margaret Ware, at Dover, on 8th September, 1941.

Mr. S. R. H. Loxton (Town Clerk) prosecuted.

Mrs. Ivy Elizabeth Weekes, of Broomfield Cottage, Mill End, Thaxted, Essex, said that she married prisoner on 29th June, 1935, at, the West Ham Registry Office. Prisoner was, then working on the L.N.E.R. They lived at Walthamstow and Leyton until prisoner was called up in June, 1940. There were two; children of the marriage, one aged 3 years and the other 5 years. On 20th September this year she received a letter from prisoner saying that he had married another girl, whom he loved.

Mrs. Violet Gibbs, of Rochdale Road, Leyton, gave evidence of witnessing the marriage at West Ham.

Miss Ware, aged 19 years, of 16, Albany Place, Dover, said that she met prisoner about February or March this year, and afterwards saw him nearly every night. She talked to him about marriage as she was expecting a child, and then he told her he was married man. She discussed divorce, and prisoner said that he would ask his wife about it as they were not happily married. He said that it would take months, so they decided to risk it and get married. They went through a form of marriage at the Registry Office, Kearsney, on September 8th.

Henry Edward Ware, father of the previous witness, said that he witnessed the form of marriage between his daughter and prisoner.

Det. Constable Haynes said that he arrested prisoner on October 24th.

Prisoner was committed for trial at Maidstone Assizes on November 13th, and reserved his defence. He was allowed bail, Mr. Ware consenting to act surety.

___________________________

Both soldiers were sentenced as follows................... 



Dover Express - Friday 21 November 1941

DOVER SOLDIERS' BIGAMY.

Pte. Charles William Weekes, 26, pleaded guilty at the Kent Assizes, at Maidstone, to bigamously marrying Ruth Margaret Ware at Dover, on September 8th, 1941.

Mr L. S. Fletcher said that Weekes married in June, 1935. He was called up in June, 1940, and met the other girl, aged 19, who was employed the Dover Sports Gardens. She knew prisoner was married, but the girl said she would "risk it," and the ceremony took place on Sept. 8th.

Mr. Justice Charles said that apparently the girl was living with him before the ceremony.

Asked if he had anything to say, Weekes replied, "I love this girl and intend to stick to her and marry her properly when I can."

Sentencing Weekes to a nominal sentence of five days—to date from the opening of the Assize, which meant his immediate release —the Judge said that it must not be thought that he regarded bigamy lightly.

Pte. William James Gregory, 37, described as an excellent soldier and thoroughly reliable man, was bound over for two years for bigamously marrying Mary E. A. Turner, at Dover, on March 1st, 1941.

__________________________________

I have been through the CWGC files and as far as I can see both William James Gregory and Charles William Weekes survived the war.

Offline Pete

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #35 on: May 19, 2022, 12:19:31 pm »
On Tuesday, at the sitting of the magistrates at Lewes, Edward Henry Mitchell Randall, a youth not 17 years of age, was brought up charged with having, on the 27th December last, at Ringmer, intermarried with Lucy Bray, his wife, Emily Tapper, whom he had married only three weeks previously at Brighton, being still alive. The magistrates remanded the case till Friday, for the attendance of witnesses, when prisoner was again brought up before Mr B. Godlee, Mr Lamb appearing for the defence; and, Sergeant Doust having produced a certificate of the marriage at Ringmer, it appeared in evidence that the prisoner was married to Lucy Bray at Ringmer parish church on the 27th December, he having written to her to leave her place for that purpose. She was at prisoner's mother's house in Brighton on the 6th December, and was then told by a fitter at the railway, named Reuben Taylor, that prisoner was married on the previous day. She understood that the said marriage took place at the parish church, and went to enquire of Mr Shelley, the clerk, who told her it was not so. Previous to his marriage with her, prisoner had denied having been married, and said that to prove it he would go to Ringmer, and put up the banns to be married to her. When she went to Mrs Mitchell's at the beginning of December, Mrs Mitchell told her in the presence of prisoner that he was keeping company with a young woman at the Feathers Tavern, but he denied that such was the fact. Prisoner was taken into custody at the Brighton station on the 31st January, by Sergeant Gould, to whom he admitted both marriages. At this examination the marriage of prisoner, in the name of Henry Edward Mitchell, sawmaker, to Emily Tupper, at Bond-street Chapel, on the 5th December, was proved by Mr George Smith, registrar of marriages for Brighton district, who produced the marriage register; and by Reuben Taylor, who was present at the marriage, and who told Lucy Bray of the circumstance the following day, and offered to take her to the party to whom prisoner was married, which she declined, choosing rather to believe the oath of prisoner that it was not so. Prisoner, whose defence was reserved, was fully committed to take his trial at the assizes. He will not be seventeen until the t4th of May; Emily Tupper, who has been employed at the Feathers Tavern, was about twenty at the time of her marriage, and Lucy Bray, a fresh-looking country girl, about nineteen.-

North Wales Chronicle 12 February 1859

 Henry Edward Randall, a youth of sixteen, has been committed by the Lewes magistrates for bigamy, This mere boy was married at Brighton on the 5th of December last, and on the 27th of the same month went through the same ceremony with a servant girl at Ringmer.

Monmouthshire Merlin 19 February 1859
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Offline Pete

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #36 on: May 31, 2022, 15:10:31 pm »
TERRIBLE STORY FROM THE DIVORCE COURT. A WIFE'S SAD STORY. In the Divorce Division of the High Court of Justice on Tuesday (before the President. Sir Francis Jeune) a case was heard in which Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Catherine Thompson petitioned for a dissolution of her marriage with the Rev. James Henry Thompson, formerly curate at West Bromwich, then at Gulval. near Penzance, and latterly at Beaulieu. near Southampton, by reason of his cruelty, and adultery with a young girl. There was no defence. Mr. Priestley, who appeared for the petitioner, said that the marriage took place on the 14th of August, 1879, at Poole, Dorsetshire. There was no issue of the marriage, and Mr. and Mrs. Thompson adopted a child. Respondent was formerly in the Army as a lieutenant. Unfortunately, be was of drunken habits, and for being drunk on parade was dismissed from the Army. Later on, somehow or other, he got ordained, and became a, curate at West Bromwich, near Birmingham, and at Gulval, near Penzance. At the latter place he became acquainted with a girl whom he need only refer to as "Jane," and he took great interest in her. His wife thought he was too free with her, and remonstrated, but he denied that there was anything improper. They subsequently removed to Beaulieu, in Hampshire, and the respondent insisted upon having the girl there, stating that he wanted to get her an appointment at the schools as pupil-teacher. He took his meals with her, and petitioner and her sister had to have their meals alone. Petitioner, in consequence. said she would leave him, although at the time she believed there had been nothing more than indiscretion with regard to the girl. A letter found subsequently, however, put a different complexion on the matter. It was dated the 8th of May, 1893, and was a long letter beginning: "My own ever darling little wife"; and further on it ran, "Well, nothing particular except the daily and hourly worry of the awful separation," and then, "It is love, and love the deepest, the fondest love that ever man was capable of. which is the secret of my complaint. My darling Janey, I do not think you will ever really know how strong. how deep, how overwhelming is my love for you, my precious little wife." Them reference was made to someone surprising them kissing in a railway carriage, and the letter concluded, "And now good-bye, darling, with fondest and deepest love, and heaps of kisses. —Your ever-loving and devoted Hubby." About nine crosses followed. That letter only got into the petitioner's hands after she had got rid of the girl. Now (said counsel) he had to come to another unfortunate event. There was a girl at Beaulieu School, only eleven years of age, in July. 1896. whose name was Maude Young. The respondent set to work in the most deliberate manner to corrupt that girl, and. he was sorry to say, succeeded in seducing her. In June. 1900, he changed his curacy from Beaulieu to Fawley, an adjoining parish. While there he was teaching the girl to write love letters to him, and there was a number of such letters, partly in cypher, which he had taught her. In May, 1899, Maude Young and her sister went into the petitioner's service as ordinary servants, and after some time petitioner noticed that her husband was paying the child a great deal of attention. Her suspicions were aroused, and she left him for a time to go to her home, because she was ill. At the time she promised her husband to return to him if he got rid of the girl, as, for the sake  of a man who was a clergyman.  she  was willing to overlook the indiscretion. On August 31 last, however, Mr. Thompson was arrested at the instigation of Maude Young's father, and she being under sixteen years (she was then fifteen) respondent was committed tor trial for the criminal offence with Maude Young. He was convicted before Mr. Justice Ridley on the 22nd of November last year of the crime referred to, and was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour. Mrs. Thompson, although she had continued to live at the house, had refused to forgive her husband. As to the cruelty, counsel said it was not in the nature of a physical violence. but it was injury to the petitioner's health through the worry. Formerly she had enjoyed good health, but her husband's conduct was a terrible blow to her, and her health had, completely broken down under the mental strain. Her health was, in fact, shattered. and she was not at all like the woman she formerly was. The petitioner was then examined. She appeared weak and ill, and was allowed to give her evidence sitting on the solicitors' bench in front of counsel. She spoke of the marriage and of her husband's dismissal from the Army in 1889. He was ordained, and first got a curacy at West Bromwich, near Birmingham, and afterwards at Gulval. near Penzance. In 1893 there was a girl. named Jane, aged sixteen years, in the choir stalls, and her husband paid her particular attention. He wished her to go to Beaulieu, and she was to become a pupil-teacher there, but she did not become a teacher. The petitioner bore out counsel's statement with regard to her. After she had been sent back to Penzance they made the acquaintance of the girl, Maude Young, who was then eleven years of age. In 1899, when fourteen years old, she and her sister came into their service After speaking of other facts in the case, the petitioner said that after her husband's arrest the had. at her solicitor's request, consented to lire in the house, but she declined to forgive her husband. Her health had very much Buffered because of her husband's conduct, which had preyed on her mind. After his committal her husband processed great penitence, and asked her to forgive him. She had ascertained that while expressing penitence he was all the time corresponding with Maude Young. She found the following letter, dated November 8, addressed to the girl:—"My own ever darling sweet little Maudie,—I don't know into whose hands this letter may fall, so you will understand why I do not use our usual terms. I am having the bicycle done up for your father. I am giving it to him for your take, darling. You know I promised it to him before anything happened. I don't know, how- ever. how to let him have it. He must not have it before all is over, I suppose, or they might say it was a bribe. I winder if you received the letter I wrote the other day. I have only written one besides this since I saw you. You will stick to me, darling, won't you? I know you will be true to me in every way and keep all your promises faithfully. You can trust me; I will do all I said I would, and keep all my promises faithfully. Don't believe anything they say against me. Don't listen to it. I thought I would just like to write these few words before the trial come off. No matter what happens. I will never give you up. So trust me implicitly, stick to me through thick and thin, through cloud and sunshine. I have been perfectly true to you in every way, and will always be so. Wait patiently, darling. I am your very own, and you are mine. I shall look out for you at W-. I have lovely things to give you, but I suppose I must not give them to you until all is settled. I don't know yet for certain what L (meaning the petitioner) is going to do. but have perfect faith in me, darling. No matter how long we may be separated, all will come right before long. I dare not write as I should like to You will understand, darling, but just these few lines to tell you that nothing will make the slightest difference to me. I will never give you up. You are mine for life, and beyond that, and I am yours. Be true as steel in every way; keep your promises, and never despair.—Your own ever loving and devoted Henry." Petitioner said her husband was out on bail at the time. He was afterwards convicted and sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment. Martha Slade. a sister of the petitioner. was called in support of the charge of cruelty. Dr. Leese and Dr. Turner, who had attended the petitioner, said that the conditions under which the petitioner had lived were calculated to injure her health. Mr. George Young, who looked like a labouring man, living at Hill-top. Fawley, said Maude Young was his daughter. He met the Rev. Mr. Thompson last year near Fawley. He asked witness to let his daughter stay at home. and not go into service. He said he would allow her £20 a year, and come to see her once a week. Witness said he would not allow such a thing. Mr. Thompson then asked him if he would consent to his taking a Couple of furnished rooms at Southampton or somewhere. so that he could come and see her there, and he would, he said, pay all expenses. Witness repeated that he would not allow such thing. He told Mr. Thompson that he had good wife. and that he ought to be ashamed of himself. He said he liked Maude very much, and he could never get over it. He then asked witness to take her a box, which. be said, only contained some flowers. Witness took the box, and on his way home opened it, and found inside some flowers and a letter. which he handed to the magistrate. He instituted proceedings against Mr. Thompson, and he was arrested and convicted. He heard his daughter state that Mr. Thompson had committed adultery with her. The President said he was satisfied the cruelly was established, and characterised the respondent's conduct with regard to Maude Young as abominable. He pronounced a decree nisi for the dissolution of the marriage, with costs.


Weekly Mail 15 June 1901
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Offline Pete

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2022, 11:44:44 am »
In the Divorce Division on Tuesday the President had before him the undefended petition of Mrs. Alice Garratt for a judicial separation by reason of the adultery of her husband, the Rev. Frederick Mills Garratt, a clergyman, formerly of Chalgrave, Bedfordshire, and latterly of Busbridge, near Godalming, with a lady named Gwendolen Parry. Mr. Hume Williams, who appeared for the petitioner, said that the parties were married on the 29th of September, 1881, at Chalgrave, Bedfordshire, and there were three children. At the beginning of this year they were living at Bushbridge, a village near Godalming, and the respondent said he was going for a trip to Norway, lie went away on the 5th of August, and on the 7th he wrote to say he would not return. She heard nothing of him again until September, when a letter, which had been directed to Staithes to the respondent, not finding him, was forwarded to Godalming. From this clue it was discovered that the respondent and Gwendoline Parry had been at Staithes, and had afterwards gone to Bridlington. The petitioner was called, and bore out counsel's statement. His Lordship: Is your husband a clergyman? Petitioner: He is. His Lordship: That is a matter which ought not to be concealed, because it comes under the Clergy Discipline Act. Mr. Hume Williams: I did not intend to conceal it. It would have come out on the question of identification. Mrs. Ann Verrall, of High-street, Staithes, gave evidence to the effect that from the 6th to the 13th of September she let rooms to a Mr. and Mrs. Garratt. Asked how the gentle- man was dressed, she said lie wore "one of those suits with a belt, and a Tarn o' Shanter hat," and a clergyman's collar. His Lordship granted a judicial separation with costs and custody of the children.

Evening Express 22 December 1897
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Offline Pete

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Re: Bigamy, illegitimacy & adultery..
« Reply #38 on: September 03, 2023, 10:03:02 am »
A BIGAMOUS SCOUNDREL.  At Eastbourne on Monday Jack Scott (36), a smith, was charged with having twice committed bigamy, and also with defrauding another young woman, named Mary Beckingham, of £30, by a promise of marriage. The latter charge was heard first. Mary Beckingham, in domestic service at Eastbourne, said she met prisoner in October last, when he said his name was Jack Scott. The second night that she saw her he said he was a single man, and the third night suggested marriage. Subsequently he borrowed £30 of her, saying he had £50 with which to buy a blacksmith's business at Petworth. She accepted him, and he asked her to have the banns put up at St. John's Church, Meads. Receiving no answer to a letter, Miss Beckingham consulted the police, and later on the prisoner 'Wrote begging her not to take action. If you. press this prosecution," his letter ran, you will ruin me, and you will gain nothing by it, only 'the satisfaction of seeing me punished whereas, if you withdraw, I swear to refund your money and make all up to you within three months." Evidence was then given in the two cases of alleged bigamy, and the accused was ultimately committed for trial on the charges.

Cardiff Times 24 June 1899

 At Sussex Summer Assizes, held at Lewes on Monday, Jack Scott, an engineer, aged 36. was sentenced to five years' penal servitude for bigamy and fraud. The prisoner, who appears to have led a somewhat extraordinary career, has during the past few years been "married" to three different women, and at Eastbourne recently he became engaged to a parlourmaid named Mary Beckingham, from whom he obtained £30 by saying that he intended buying a blacksmith's business at Petworth when they were married.

Evening Express 4 July 1899
Sussex Bonfire - a way of life, not just for Nov 5th