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Author Topic: We wunt be druv - or Sussex dialect and accent!  (Read 7517 times)
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John
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« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2013, 16:08:03 PM »

Hastings and St Leonards Observer - Saturday 13 December 1879

A SUSSEX PECULIARITY OF SPEECH. The true Sussex man divides the world into two parts. Kent and Sussex forms one division, and all the rest is "the Sheeres." One may hear China and Australia both described as being in the sheeres, and a visitor was once startled at being told that he was "a man who was well acquainted with the sheeres, and had got friends in all parts of this world and the world to come." This statement was meant as a compliment, but when he came to consider it afterwards, he was not sure it was altogether complimentary to some of his friends. A "sheere-man" is one who comes from the sheeres.
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Den Chersplat
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« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2013, 12:54:42 PM »

Also there is (or was?) the Twitten, a road in West Green, Crawley - and not far from it is (or was?) the Dingle. A dingle is a small wooded valley, the noun originating in middle English. Does anyone know whether it has a Sussex connection?

Somewhere I have a little booklet written by the man who named the streets of Crawley New Town.

At first he tried to use as many dialect names as he could, and even named streets after the names of the farms or fields etc they were built on.

He soon ran out and ended up naming streets after trees, saints, birds, animals etc, such as can be seen in Langley Green.
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pomme homme
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« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2013, 14:35:28 PM »

Wikipedia on twitten:

'Twitten is a Sussex dialect word, used in both East and West Sussex, for a path or alleyway. It is still in official use in some towns including Lewes, Brighton and Cuckfield.'

A dingle does not appear to be a noun specific to Sussex, there being examples of the use of the word - to describe a small wooded valley - throughout the British Isles.
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daveSea
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« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2013, 16:52:27 PM »

Hi Dan welcome to the group

The guy who named the streets in Crawley was John Goepel - I thought I'd created a thread about him - Must have been another forum
When I remember which one I'll post it here as well.

There is a blue plaque on his house in Little Crabtree, West Green , he died in 1994.

Museum society sell the booklet now - I haven't got a copy.

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Dave
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« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2013, 20:21:42 PM »

That's the man. I never knew him, but I did, vaguely, know his widow.

I have seen some of the blue plaques around the town, but am pleased to hear about the one in Little Crabtree.
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John
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« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2015, 11:40:38 AM »

West Sussex accent - sounds normal to me?

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pomme homme
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« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2015, 17:03:44 PM »

To me it sounds like a good middle class accent that might be heard anywhere in south-east England and the home counties. But maybe that's what one hears in West Sussex these days.

I rather doubt that there is an accent peculiar to Sussex these days. Like so much of the south-east, it has become a 'melting pot' since the end of the last war - and that reflects in the accents one can hear spoken.

I don't have the experience to speak generally of a West Sussex accent. But I can speak, with experience, of Crawley. When I was young, in the sixties, probably the predominating accent was 'sarf lunnun' - by virtue of those who had relocated from the Victorian terraces of London (at least those that survived the bombs) to the 'bright uplands' of the new town. By the eighties Asian accents were to be heard widely in the town. As I haven't lived in the UK for many years, I don't know what accent prevails now. Maybe others are equipped to comment?
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mikejee
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« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2015, 23:04:01 PM »

As has been said it sounds like a normal middle class English accent. Certainly "How Now Brown Cow" would not have been Sussex 60 years ago. I remember my english teacher
Mr Pelham (Hop -a-long) making me repeat "The hounds went round the south downs" repeatedly every day for a while in the hope of obliterating my Sussex Twang. He did actually succeed, and I sounded like the girl (well sort of) when he had finished And it stuck.
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Downsman
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« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2015, 19:29:04 PM »

Yup, chav was certainly in use as a 'matey' term in the early 80's in Canterbury.

Just a thought..
Chavi is the Romany word for young girl, Chava is used for young boys. Is it possible that like many Romany words they've been picked up by country folk and found their way into local dialects?

O pal is Rom for friend..now everybody's mate is their....Pal.. Wink
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tallstory
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« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2015, 16:46:51 PM »

Here is a recording of Bill Armiger reading one of his poems. It's not very good quality but it does give an idea of the local Sussex dialect he spoke. It's an MP3 but I had to zip it up to make load onto the forum - hope this works.

Bill died in 1982 at the age of 75 and is buried, with his wife Elsie, in Friston churchyard. Our local history group has lots more about him if anyone is interested in more information.

There are 2 attachment(s) in this post which you cannot view or download
Bill Armiger outside East Dean Church.jpg
Darby's Hole.zip
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Icare9
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« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2016, 18:31:34 PM »

We have a Crouch Lane in Ninfield and I'm told it should be pronounced as Crew-ch.
That made me wonder if it was some corruption of Cruche (cross) but it doesn't seem to be a cross roads, so I'm wondering if it's a form of "crooked" as it's a remarkably twisty little lane..
Any ideas?
I'd always thought it from a family named Crouch, but Crewch is what I'm told!
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Herman Hessian
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« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2018, 16:45:55 PM »

got pulled up at the weekend by Mrs H for pronouncing Ticehurst as "Tyz'urst" as I always have done, on the basis that it always used to be written as Tyshurst or Tysehurst which looks much more like it should have the "z" rather than "c" sound (dropping the 'aitch is just me being unaccountably common); mind, she's a posh farmer's daughter from Warbleton way, so I reckon she's just trying to appear sophisticated...
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kate
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« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2018, 18:13:50 PM »

 Chav, I think is from the Romany, Chavvy - child.
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Pete
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We Wunt Be Druv


WWW
« Reply #28 on: May 15, 2018, 08:24:12 AM »

Kate, that was always my understanding too
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Icare9
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« Reply #29 on: May 15, 2018, 13:51:13 PM »

... but that's Romany, not a Sussex dialect word...
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