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Author Topic: Fossils  (Read 16145 times)
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #30 on: July 22, 2013, 16:13:07 PM »

Is that all you've got to show for your day out yesterday, John?
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John
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« Reply #31 on: July 22, 2013, 16:21:20 PM »

Yup  Shocked

When we descended the steps to the beach and walked along to the base of the cliffs, it was quite a strange experience. Literally dozens of fossil hunters all hammering away at various blocks and nodules, with the odd cry of glee and half-hearted jig of excitement coming from some of them. I'd brought my trusty hammer, so we all tried doing the same as the others.. obviously they all knew what they were looking for, because none of our lumps yielded anything apart from... chalk  Grin

Did spot a couple of impressions of bivalves in chalk, and I think a certain young lady found the impression of an ammonite in flint, but apart from that the rest of the time there was spent trying to avoid looking at the grotesque old men sunbathing in Speedos, and the equally grotesque old women 'getting their baps out'.
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #32 on: July 22, 2013, 16:46:45 PM »

Ha ha Grin! !  You should have come over here for the excitement of the maiden run of my new garden gadget  Wink ...........................
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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #33 on: September 27, 2013, 12:04:36 PM »

Two views of a rather nice solitary coral from the Thanet Chalk. These are absolutely tiny, but look for the pale brown staining in the chalk, usually pointing towards a fossil of coral or bryozoa.
It could have been further cleaned by dropping distilled vinegar on it for a short time.  This eats away the chalk, but it also eats away at the fossil at a slower rate so don't leave it on too long!  Rinse right away.

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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2013, 17:43:49 PM »

A nice section of Gault Clay with numerous fossils recently found by the Scott family of Ramsgate on a trip to Copt Point in Folkestone.   The Gault is Lower Cretaceous Period (Upper and Middle Albian).

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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #35 on: September 29, 2013, 22:54:12 PM »

That's an impressive group of fossils to have found, Ron!
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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #36 on: September 29, 2013, 22:59:25 PM »

That's pretty average for Copt Point.  A great fossil location.  It was the first visit there for the Scott family.  A couple of dinosaur mad lads, apparently really enjoyed themselves.
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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2013, 10:20:04 AM »

This is a close-up of the Ptychodus polygyrus, from Ramsgate, posted a while ago.

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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #38 on: December 10, 2013, 09:57:43 AM »

This is a part of one tooth of the Ptychodus, which seems to have been bitten after the shark died.  I don't imagine dead sharks stay whole for long after they die.

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John
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« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2015, 15:45:16 PM »

In the roof of the tunnel system at Fan Bay Battery, Dover. How many times have I walked under it and not seen it?

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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #40 on: February 21, 2015, 20:40:02 PM »

Several things going on here John.  Difficult to tell without sizes but probably part of a spiny cockle, perhaps an Inoceramus bivalve, but maybe a Pectin (scallop type).  Also contemporary drilling of the shells.
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« Reply #41 on: February 21, 2015, 20:53:14 PM »

Thanks Ron. I didn't think to add something for scale, but going by memory it was about the size of an average adult male hand.
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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #42 on: November 13, 2015, 23:20:59 PM »

Something slightly different, found in North Kent.

A crystal of Selenite.  Calcium sulfate dihydrate, with the chemical formula CaSO4•2H2O.
From the London Clay at Warden Point, Isle of Sheppey.  Found by Andy Temple.

It looks a bit like quartz, but is warm to the touch, and the surface can be scratched by a finger nail.  In the gypsum family.

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