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Author Topic: Thames & Medway Canal  (Read 2119 times)
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John
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« on: June 14, 2012, 16:34:27 PM »

The Thames and Medway Canal, also known as the Gravesend and Rochester Canal, was originally around 7 miles in length. It cut across the neck of the Hoo peninsula, linking the River Thames at Gravesend with the River Medway at Strood. The canal was first mooted in 1778 as a shortcut for military craft from Deptford and Woolwich Dockyards on the Thames to Chatham Dockyard on the Medway, avoiding the 26 mile journey round the peninsula and through the Thames estuary. The canal was also intended to take commercial traffic between the two rivers. The Higham and Strood tunnel at the canal site was around 2 miles in length, and was the second longest canal tunnel built in the UK.

Two sections of a large plan showing the proposed course of the canal, dated 1809...

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cliveh
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2012, 11:22:55 AM »

Do you know if any trace of this canal still remains John?

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mmitch
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2012, 11:36:38 AM »

Basically a section from Denton to the Higham tunnel still exists. Some work on getting it tidied up has been done by volunteers. It was disconnected from Gravesend canal basin by the building of the Norfolk road industrial estate.
The canal basin has been revamped recently and is a tidy marina.
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cliveh
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« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2012, 11:47:14 AM »

Basically a section from Denton to the Higham tunnel still exists. Some work on getting it tidied up has been done by volunteers. It was disconnected from Gravesend canal basin by the building of the Norfolk road industrial estate.
The canal basin has been revamped recently and is a tidy marina.
mmitch.

Thanks mmitch

cliveh
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pomme homme
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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2012, 15:48:01 PM »

Is the Higham & Strood Tunnel the only one in the UK to have served both canal and railway traffic?
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John
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« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2013, 11:05:34 AM »

.

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helcion
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« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2013, 11:10:59 AM »

Last time I was there [a couple of years ago admittedly] the canal basin & lock gates still existed in a ruinous state at the Strood end of the tunnel.

Maybe someone has been there recently ?
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Ron Stilwell
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« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2013, 15:11:20 PM »

There seems to still be locks at both Milton and Strood, but nothing much else.
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Pete
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« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2013, 16:05:12 PM »

I Haven't been there for years but the lock gates at Strood are there in name only, pretty much derelict. I recall paddling around in the lock basin on an EOD exercise in the late 1970s- the tide was rising through the closed gates then. The basin now looks infilled. The line of most of the canal still exists but is not much more than an overgrown ditch in most parts from Milton Ranges to the tunnel
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Pete
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« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2017, 12:22:51 PM »

THE THAMES AND MFDWAY.
The grand union between the River Thames and Medway will be effected very shortly, by means of the largest tunnel, we believe, in the world. This giant public undertaking commences immediately, from the Port of London, below Gravesend, where there is a large river lock capable of admitting vessels ol 200 tons into a capsicious basin, with commodious wharfage. The canal, which is fifty feet wide, and seven feet deep in water, passes through the marsh lands to the vilage of Higham, a distance of nearly five miles, where the tunnel begins, which is twenty-two feet wide on the water level, and eight feet deep at spring tides, twenty-four feet six inches high from the water surface to the apex of the arch, with a towing pith five feet wide, firmly protected by means of a cast-iron and timber railing. Ihe tunnel continues under the chalk hills for a distance of upwards of two miles, where it terminates in a very large basin, commanded by a lock entering into the River Medway. and capable of receiving vessels of 300 tons. The whole length of this canal, from the River Thames to the Medwav. is only 7 1/4  miles ;
and by  this very short line all the circuitous, tedious, and often times, dangerous passage round the Nore is avoided, thereby saving a distance of at least  forty lo fifiy miles Thus the communication from the interior of Kent wish the North of England is made easy, safe, and at a comparatively trifling expence, with the advantage of a more certain passage, as well as a considerable saving on wear and tear of sails and tackle, &c. This important line also opens a communication from Tonbridge by means of the Regent's and Grand Junction Canals to Branstone in Northamptonshire, for the same sized craft, without any transhipment of goods, which may be forwarded to any ol the Northern parts of England. Craft from seven to eighteen feet beam can navigate the whole line, which it is obvious will secure to inland commerce incalculable advantages

The Cambrian 16/10/1824
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2017, 16:03:25 PM »

In the progress of excavating the basin for the canal, which is to connect the River Thames and Medway, a stratum of peat has been discovered, in which large trees are found, apparently oak and yew, some standing, others lying horizontally, and some in all directions we must leave to naturalists to explain this extraordinary phenomena in nature. The work goes on rapidly at the end towards the Thames, and it will not be long before the foundation-stone (which is already prepared, with an appropriate, inscription) is laid down

North Wales Gazette 7/12/1809
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