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Author Topic: Ightham Mote  (Read 1384 times)
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cliveh
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« on: July 23, 2012, 15:18:27 PM »

Ightham Mote, in Ivy Hatch near Tonbridge, is a beautiful, moated, medieval manor house dating from the 14th century. The earliest reputed owner may have been one Isolde Inge (c.1330 – c.1360) who it is thought built the oldest part of the house including the Great Hall, Old Chapel & Crypt. The first recorded owner was Sir Thomas Cawne (c.1360 – 1374). He was a Kent MP in 1368 and is buried in Ightham church.

From 1399 to 1519 the house was in the ownership of the Haute family which included a number of Sheriffs of Kent and MPs. In 1519 the House was sold to a Thomas Welles, of whom little is known. In 1521 Welles sold  it to Sir Richard Clement, a royal courtier from Sussex. He was knighted in 1529 and was Sheriff of Kent from 1531 – 32.

A series of private owners improved and embellished the property over the following 410 years until, in 1951, the then owner, Sir James Colyer-Fergusson Bt. put the  house and it’s contents up for auction. The house was sold to a consortium of Kentish businessmen who bought it to save it from destruction.

In 1953 Charles Henry Robinson, a U.S. citizen and bachelor from Portland, Maine, bought the property. In 1985 he donated the house to the National Trust. In 1988, in it’s largest ever restoration and conservation project, the Trust dismantled virtually the whole building, recording it’s construction methods and then re-built it.

cliveh

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IMG_4945 Ightham Mote - East Front - Copy.jpg
IMG_4950 Ightham Mote - North Front.jpg
IMG_4960 Ightham Mote - South Front.jpg
IMG_4969 Ightham Mote - West Front.jpg
IMG_4985 Ightham Mote- The Courtyard - North Range - Copy.jpg
IMG_4987 Ightham Mote- The Courtyard - East Range - Copy.jpg
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2012, 23:03:30 PM »

It also has what is believed to be the UK's only Grade I Listed dog kennel...............................(Cave Canus!)

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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2012, 23:12:51 PM »

.........and a few more pics from my archives:-

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Ightham Mote - Memorial To Thomas Riversdale Collyer-Fergusson, V.C..JPG
Ightham Mote - The Billiard Room.JPG
Ightham Mote - The North Lake.JPG
Ightham Mote From The South Lake.JPG
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John
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2012, 07:54:05 AM »

Lovely pictures, gentlemen  Smiley
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John
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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 07:39:28 AM »

Six old photographs of Igtham Mote. Dates are a bit vague, but definitely between 1926 and WWII..

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cliveh
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« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2013, 14:52:07 PM »

A few shots of the interior:

cliveh

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IMG_4994 Ightham Mote - Great Hall - Fireplace.jpg
IMG_4995 Ightham Mote - Great Hall - Tapestry c1700.jpg
IMG_5000 Ightham Mote - Butler's Pantry - Strong Room Door.jpg
IMG_5003 Ightham Mote - The Crypt - Plaster Sculpture of the 'Black Prince'.jpg
IMG_5025 Ightham Mote - The Solar Bedroom.jpg
IMG_5034 Ightham Mote - The New Chapel - Altar Table.jpg
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2013, 21:25:00 PM »

Nice shots, cliveh!
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cliveh
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2013, 18:34:10 PM »

Nice shots, cliveh!


Thanks mok1  Smiley
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2013, 15:51:12 PM »

Not many folk looking at this page, cliveh, but do we care?  We like it, anyway!
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John
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« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2017, 17:54:13 PM »

Pall Mall Gazette - Wednesday 19 June 1889

THE MOTE-HOUSE AT IGHTHAM.
HUGE posters at Sevenoaks station and a paragraph in the advertisement columns of the Field tells us that Ightham Mote is for sale. So yet another old English home is to pass away from a family which has now held it for generations, and the estate is to be broken up into nine lots, eight of which are considered suitable for the erection of "superior residences "! A short year or so ago the archaeological world was shocked to hear that Ockwells, near Maidenhead, was in danger of demolition, and now this other fine old property, though scarcely doomed, we should imagine, to such a fate as that, is threatened with all the indefinite dangers which may possibly arise when such places pass into the market, Whoever purchases Ightham Mote takes upon himself a sacred duty - the duty of maintaining intact, to the best of his powers, a building which, of its kind, is probably the finest in England. Kent is, indeed, fortunate in possessing two such show-places as Ightham Mote and Penshurst-place - the latter our best specimen of the old baronial hall, the former of the half-timbered manor house.

We may best reach the Mote - or, as it is sometimes quaintly called, the Mote House at Ightham - from the Wrotham and Borough Green Station on the branch line between Sevenoaks and Maidstone, Our way lies southwards through the village of Ightham, where are the church - of which more hereafter - and one or two good timbered cottages. The visitor should notice especially the group by the inn. After this we rise gradually for the next two or three miles to the summit of the sandstone ridge which runs parallel to the great range of the North Downs throughout almost all Kent and Surrey. The hedgerows at this season of the year are thick with stitchworts and speedwells, and already the dog-roses are beginning to bloom along the country lanes. Looking back, we trace the long line of the chalk downs stretching towards Maidstone and the valley of the Medway, and in front, as we gain the brow of our own ridge, we look out over the great weald, beyond Shipbourne (which local people call Shibbourne) and Tunbridge, to the distant Forest Range, which rises beyond Tunbridge Wells. Close at hand are the hop-fields, where the young hops have already climbed nearly to the top of their poles, and amongst which the circular oast-houses, with their Egyptian-like fans, give the country a picturesque and characteristic appearance. Presently we turn off to our right and descend into a secluded hollow, in which lies the old house, rising from its sleepy mote, the very picture of "a haunt of ancient peace."

The building dates from three periods, the earliest of which is that of Edward III, the latest the seventh or eighth Henry. Most of the timberwork belongs to this latter time, and is to be found inside the quadrangle; the outer walls are chiefly of stone, though the upper stages of the entrance tower are of crumbling brick. A right of way exists close by the house, and sitting upon the low wall which surrounds the mote, with our legs dangling over the rather stagnant water, we may contemplate the place at our leisure. No one is here to disturb us: the only being in sight is an old man working in a garden, The very swans on the mote are making their toilet in a lazy kind of way, and the shoals of fish which are sometimes visible come slowly into sight and slowly disappear. The walls of the house rise straight from the water, and just where they emerge from it masses of gay wild flowers have fixed themselves in the cracks of the masonry. Round the house, on every side but one, the ground rises immediately into low steep hills; there is no park-land, but the slopes are clothed with wood and hop-gardens.
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