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Author Topic: Man's best friend?  (Read 2422 times)
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2015, 16:06:36 PM »

............................otherwise the report was quite accurate!
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Pete
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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2017, 15:22:20 PM »

CLIFF ACCIDENT CAUSED BY A DOG A young woman, Miss Ada Clough. was found lying on the rocks at the foot of Ventnor cliffs with a broken ankle on Friday morning. While she was walking on the cliff path the evening before her pet dog leaped up against her, causing her to fall over the cliffs, a distance of some 30 feet. She lay where she fell all night. The dog was keeping watch by her when she was found.  17/12/1910 Denbighshire Free Press

A young widow was found badly injured at the foot of the cliffs at Ventnor with her pet dog mounting guard over her. The little animal was the cause of the mishap, for while his mistress was walking on the cliffs the previous evening he jumped up at her and caused her to stumble and fall over the edge. Her right ankle was broken in her drop of some 40 feet, and, unable to move or to make anyone hear, she lay all through the wet and stormy night until the watermen looking for wreckage discovered her early in the morning.
17/12/1910 Merthyr Express
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Sussex Bonfire - a way of life, not just for Nov 5th
Pete
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« Reply #17 on: January 30, 2017, 13:40:11 PM »

A MAD DOG AT LARGE.
A mongrel spaniel bit several dogs at Lewes, and then it went to West Dean and bit a lad named Marchant. Next it went to Seaford, and started to emulate the career of the animal described in Goldsmith's "Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog." The Rev W. H. M. Buck, vicar of Seaford, kindly befriended the wanderer, offered it food and water, and attempted to stroke it, and the dog bit two of his fingers. Finding the railway officials at the station inhospitable - it having bitten a clerk there - it attacked a boy named Costick, who had to be taken to a doctor. Then a hunt began. The dog visited the Terminus Hotel, and was promptly ejected. It ran down Church-street, and was shot by Mr Brand. A Lewes veterinary surgeon examined tbe body, and said it had suffered from rabies. The Rev Mr Buck and tbe other patients have  gone to Paris for treatment by M. Pasteur, the Mayor paying their expenses.

Cardiff Times 21/9/1889
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Pete
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« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2017, 11:46:02 AM »

At Byworth, near Horsham, Charles Stees, aged four and a half years, has died from hydrophobia. On the 21st of August the deceased was playing in the street, when a mad dog flew at him and bit him severely in several places, and afterwards attacked some sheep which have since died. The deceased was attended by Dr. Hope, who dressed the wounds, which healed in a few days. On Saturday he became very ill and would not touch food, and gradually sank and died. It seems that the same day the dog made its way to Wisborough Green, where it attacked a little boy five years of age. In this case the child was bitten severely in the face, and had also since died

Flintshire Observer 27/10/1876
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« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2017, 15:13:06 PM »

 MUCH TRAVELLED DOG.
Few people who travel on the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway know what a distinguished character has a free pass on every branch of the line, of which for several,years he has taken daily advantage (says the Illustralted Sporting and Dramatic News). It is between two and three years ago that a fox-terrier, big in bone, and not over well-bred, jumped into a train that was leaving Brighton for Horsham, and settled himself in the guard's carriage. Little notice was taken of him at first, but after a time he began to be a person of great interest. No one knew where he came from or to whom he belonged but every day he was ready for an early start in an early train. Sometimes he went to Portsmouth, sometimes to Horsham, sometimes only to nearer stations but the most remarkable part of his arrangements was that he always got to Brighton in time to go by the last train to Lewes, where he always slept, leaving again by the first train in the morning. When the friend from whom I first heard this story (and who vouches for the truth of it) last heard of Jack he still continued this practice, and always spent the night at Lewes Station. About a year and a half ago the London, Brighton, and South Coast Company began to look upon him as one of their regular servants, and presented him with a collar bearing this inscription, Jack-London, B. and S. Coast Railway Company." My friend told me that on one occasion, some months ago, he traced Jack's movements on one especial day, and probably it was a good sample of many another. He arrived from Brighton by a train reaching Steyning at 10.50; there he got out for a minute, but went on by the same train to Henfield. Here he left the [train and went to a publichouse not far from the station, where a biscuit was given to him; and, after a little walk, took a later train to West Grinstead. where he spent the afternoon, returning to Brighton in time for the last train to Lewes. He was rather fond of the Portsmouth line, but never, I believe, has come so far as London. He generally takes his place on or by the guard's wheel, and sits looking out of the window; It would be very interesting to know in what the fascination of this perpetual railway travelling consists. It certainly shows an immense amount of instinct and observa- tion, and the regularity and punctuality of Jack's daily life are a lesson to many a two-legged traveller. Whether he considers himself sub guard, or director, or general overseer, no one can tell, but there is, it seems, an idea of duty in his movements; what he has to do (or thinks he has to do) he does faithfully, and so far is a telling example to his fellow travellers on the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway.

Aberystwyth Observer 4/6/1881
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