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Author Topic: The Antifyre Pistole  (Read 1456 times)
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John
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« on: December 24, 2012, 17:55:50 PM »

Dover Express - Friday 19 December 1930

"ANTIFYRE PISTOLE" PUTTING OUT A BLAZE.

At Dover on Wednesday. The charge was fired at the base of the blaze, and extinguished it in a second.

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John
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« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2012, 17:58:16 PM »

Dover Express - Friday 17 April 1936

The Antifyre Pistole recently added to the equipment of the Fire Brigade, was used for the first time on Sunday, when it proved very effective with a chimney fire at a four-storey building, 8, Cambridge Terrace.
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Weebouy
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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2014, 15:41:01 PM »

From a Commercial Motor Vehicle magazine of 1927 ....

'The chief essential in dealing with an outbreak of fire that may occur on a motor coach or lorry is that no time be lost in dealing with it, and, further, that the firefighting apparatus can be operated successfully even by the most inexperienced. We were recently enabled to witness a demonstration of one of the latest appliances—the Antifyre pistol extinguisher—which proved very efficient.

The device comprises a seamless steel cylinder, which by means of a bayonet-type fastener is attached to a butt of the revolver type. In the head of the cylinder is a percussion cap, which, when struck by the pin as a result of pulling the trigger, causes a small quantity of black powder to be exploded, with the consequent ejection of a white powder contained in the cylinder. As with a revolver, a safety-catch is provided, and the pistol is cocked by pulling backwards a T-headed s situated at the reaz of the butt: Should the discharge of one cylinder fail to extinguish the flames, it is only a matter of a couple of seconds to attach another and fire again.
Several demonstrations showing the efficacy of the Antifyre device were given, and so instantaneous did it prove in dealing with the conflagration that the extinguishing, of the flames appeared to coincide with the pulling of the trigger.

Perhaps the most impressive test was that to show that Antifyre was capable of dealing with a blaze which can only be likened to a roaring furnace, a hut about 6 ft. high and 3 ft. 6 ins, wide, with a heavily tarred interior and timber roof, also covered with the same material, was saturated with petrol and ignited. It was then allowed to blaze until the fire had got a good hold, the flames shooting several feet into the air above the roof. The operator advanced to about 10 ft. from the blaze, and one shot directed into the centre of the flames was sufficient to quench the blaze. .

• As showing the effectiveness of Antifyre when dealing with a fire such as is experienced with petrol spreads, an 18-ft. length of carpet was sprayed with petrol and then ignited. Standing at the end of the carpet, the operator fired at the flumes, several inches in height, with instantaneous success, the operation of extinguishing the flames being so quick that the time elapsing between the' firing of the powder and the total extinction was so infinitesimal that the operator who fired the shot had no time to come back to the " rest " position.

A bucket containing film and petrol was so instantaneously quenched that the film was scarcely' burned. Other tests consisted of putting out a 12-in, gas-ring fed from a 2-in. main, and quenching a blaze caused by a stack of dry wood thoroughly impregnated with petrol. In this case the wood was allowed to burn for some minutes in order to allow the flames to char the wood, this test proving that even the embers were extinguished with the same certainty as the flames.
It is noteworthy that the powder, which is normally held in the cylinder by a wad, as in a blank cartridge, is silently discharged, is harmless to clothes and does not deteriorate.

The outfit for lorries and motor coaches retails at 37s. ed., plus 4s. 6d. for a bracket. Cylinders are recharged free, providing that the apparatus is used actually to extinguish a conflagration.

The manufacturers are Antifyre (Sales), Ltd., 69-73, Mansell Street, Aldgate, London, El.'

Seems like a very efficient antecedent of our modern powder extinguishers.

 

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mmitch
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2014, 12:04:33 PM »

I once experienced one of these while sitting having lunch in a hut
at Horsham! Some fool was playing the cowboy and we saw the safety pin fall out.
I (and the others) were under the table in a flash as our lunch was ruined!  Angry
On another occasion though it saved a workmates life.
mmitch.
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Weebouy
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2014, 14:20:22 PM »

I heard a story about an incident on a  merchant ship which was fitted with these. As the cartridges had a shelf life they were checked every so often and disposed of when out of date. One day a Cadet asked an officer if he could 'dispose 'of them by firing the old ones out over the sea. This went fine at first and a surprisingly large cloud of powder was seen on each firing. After a few runs, one of the cartridges refused to fire and the Cadet - would you believe it - yes, looked down the working end and pulled the trigger! After a large 'whoosh' his head looked like a snowman and he rushed to look under a running tap to 'see where the water was coming from'. Apparently it took several days before his nostrils were unblocked and he could breathe properly.
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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2018, 15:00:29 PM »

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 28 March 1931

THE RIGHT MAN ON THE SPOT

Whilst Mr. A. Boulting, of "Kinross," Westmeads Road, Whitstable, the local agent for "Antifyre" fire extinguishers, was motoring along Northdown Road, Margate, on Tuesday, a serious chimney fire occurred at Mr. F. Caves, 29, Gordon Road. Rushing into the house he was able to extinguish the fire and room with two cylinders before the fire brigade arrived.
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