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Author Topic: Croydon Canal  (Read 3327 times)
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Longpockets
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« on: October 18, 2013, 21:39:39 PM »

"The Croydon Canal linked to the Croydon Merstham and Godstone Railway (itself connected to the Surrey Iron Railway), enabling the canal to be used to transport stone and lime from workings at Merstham." Please see other topics.

The Croydon Canal ran 9.25 miles (15 km) from Croydon, via Forest Hill, to the Grand Surrey Canal at New Cross in south London, England. It opened in 1809 and closed in 1836, the first canal to be abandoned by an Act of Parliament.

Authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1801, the canal was originally intended to extend northwards to Rotherhithe, but the simultaneous construction of the Grand Surrey Canal provided a convenient access route. It was 9.25 miles (15 km) long, and opened on 22 October 1809.[1]
The Croydon Canal linked to the Croydon Merstham and Godstone Railway (itself connected to the Surrey Iron Railway), enabling the canal to be used to transport stone and lime from workings at Merstham. The canal was never extended further south-west, as was initially intended, to reach Epsom.
The canal was originally planned with two inclined planes but 28 locks, arranged in two flights, were used instead. To keep the canal supplied with water, reservoirs were constructed at Sydenham and South Norwood; the latter still exists as South Norwood Lake in a public park.
The canal was 34 feet (10 m) wide. It had a maximum depth of 5 feet (1.5 m). By 1811 22 barges plied the canal. The barges were 60 feet (18 m) long and 9 feet (2.7 m) wide and could carry about 30 tons. The main cargo was timber.
After the initial flights of locks, most of the canal followed the 161 ft (49.1m) contour. [2]
The final two locks at Croydon Common raised the canal to the 174 ft (53m) contour, and because there was no natural source of water a steam pumping station was built at the foot of the locks to pump water up to the summit pound.[3]
The canal was never a success and closed in 1836.,[1] the first canal to be abandoned by an Act of Parliament. Much of the alignment was used by the London & Croydon Railway Company, which had bought the canal had been sold for £40,250,[1] for part of the railway between London Bridge and West Croydon, which is on the site of the canal basin.

From here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croydon_Canal
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pomme homme
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2014, 18:15:18 PM »

Ornamental water in Betts Park at Anerley, Penge, that once was part of the Croydon Canal. Photographed c. 1967.

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pomme homme
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2014, 18:29:38 PM »

From a survey of the former route of the Croydon Canal, conducted c.1967 by Edward Treby:

'Traces of the old canal remain. At the junction with the Grand Surrey Canal, a short length of the Croydon Canal and an adjacent basin still used commercially are intact. This stretch can be seen when travelling along the Central Section of the Southern Region on the up side. As late as the 1920s, two of the original lock keeper's houses stood in Shardloes Road, Brockley, S.E.14, slightly to the east of the present railway. In Betts Park, near Anerley Station, a stretch of canal remains and is now an attractive tree lined length of ornamental water with fountains down the centre. The largest surviving fragment of the canal is South Norwood Lake, originally one of the feeding resrvoirs. It lies alongside the Crystal Palace-Birkbeck line and is a favourite haunt of fishermen, thus recalling the attraction which the canal had for anglers in the early days. At Croydon, little remains, although the path alongside the railway near West Croydon Station follows the course of the original towpath. In the grounds of an adjacent flour mill, a piece of water, originally a canal dock, survived until the present century but disappeared on rebuilding of the premises. A bridge known as "Brick Bridge" near West Croydon Station originally spanned the canal. The bridge has been widened but the parapet on the station side is the original one.'
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Longpockets
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« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2014, 21:34:10 PM »


Quite a lot of information here - http://www.londoncanals.co.uk/croydon/croy01.html

There are links at the bottom of the page to the areas the canal ran through.

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John
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2015, 16:25:15 PM »

Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Monday 15 May 1809

NAVIGATION TO CROYDON.
As the CROYDON CANAL will be opened, so as to form a complete Navigation from the River THAMES to the Town of CROYDON, in the Month of AUGUST next, all Persons desirous of preparing Barges to be used on this Canal, are hereby informed, that the Dimensions of the Barges and other Particulars may be obtained by application to the Company's Engineer, Mr. Dudley Clark, at Mill Wall Foundry, Poplar.

By Order of the Committee,
PATRICK DRUMMOND, Clerk of the Company.
DUDLEY CLARK, Engineer to the Company.
Croydon, May 13.
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John
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2016, 15:20:10 PM »

The proposed Croydon Canal. Extracted from RAIL 1017/2 at the National Archives.

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« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2016, 08:33:42 AM »

Photograph from the same source, annotated on reverse:

"Path alongside down side of line north of West Croydon Station - originally tow-path of Croydon Canal."

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Tim of Aclea
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2016, 12:28:19 PM »

I must admit that I never knew there was a Croydon Canal before.  You learn something new everyday from this site.

Tim
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Longpockets
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« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2016, 23:24:02 PM »

In John's photograph, reply 6, the gantries are, I believe, the failed Southern Railway's overhead electrification scheme prior to their third rail system. Strange that Croydon is now back with overhead power to its trams.

A tenuous link with the canal is there are pubs in South Norwood High Street named the Jolly Sailor and The Ship. The original station was called the Jolly Sailor before being renamed Norwood Junction.



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« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2016, 08:32:08 AM »

"Cottage near Forest Hill - originally Lock House on Croydon Canal."

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« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2016, 08:23:12 AM »

"Millpond north of West Croydon Station - formerly dock off Croydon Canal."

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« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2016, 09:35:46 AM »

"South Norwood Reservoir - originally a reservoir for Croydon Canal."

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« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2016, 15:03:23 PM »

"Timber Pond at Cold Blow, New Cross - commencement of Croydon Canal. Grand Surrey Canal in foreground (transverse-wise)"

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John New
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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2018, 17:52:30 PM »

I am currently working on a conference paper* about rail links (Actual and proposed) to Portsmouth and the Croydon canal has a peripheral place. This is because once opened it appears to have taken a lot of trade away from the Surrey Iron Railway and finally knocking out whatever lingering chances that link had for its onward progress to the south. This appears quite logical as it joined the Thames a long way down stream of both Wandsworth and the old London Bridge.

Regarding boat traffic on the Thames there is peripheral evidence in many places, for example commenting on the need to remove the centre pier to improve the navigation and the resultant scouring problems, but I haven't found anything stating what restrictions on boats to certain states of the tide, boat sizes etc., London Bridge may have imposed. As water traffic is not my main area of expertise can anyone supply a link to a document, or website, that gives any serious coverage to how much the old London Bridge throttled Thames river borne traffic thereby boosting the Croydon's trade?

Sadly for the Croydon Canal it was one of the late built one's in the cusp period when railways had not quite been proven as the way forward and canals still seemed a sensible new-build option.

* For the 2nd Early Main Line Railways Conference, York in late June this year.
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