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Author Topic: Childhood memories of special shops  (Read 3896 times)
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pomme homme
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« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2014, 17:05:53 PM »

.....and further south on the east side if the High Street, Crawley, was Penfolds, the seed merchants. In addition to seed it sold garden tools and small pets (including, I think, rats - at which my mother drew the line, when I suggested a visit there to upgrade from my pet mice!). It probably sold other things - but the foregoing are all I can now remember. But my strongest memory of the shop was that, even in the late sixties and early seventies, to walk through its door was akin to entering a time warp, for it seemed to appear as one might have expected it to be generations earlier. The style of its interior and its ambience were, in my memory, closer to that of a working flour mill. I've sought photographs of the interior of the shop, to ascertain whether my memory is correct, but I've found none. Have others succeeded where I've failed?
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pomme homme
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« Reply #31 on: December 30, 2016, 17:46:00 PM »

Penfolds, High Street, Crawley. The proprietors were John Penfold senior and junior, from a well known Quaker family and benefactors to the town of Crawley.

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Tim Sargeant
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« Reply #32 on: January 02, 2017, 19:26:45 PM »

Just picked up om this thread. As a Brighton boy it was Jack Ball's in Edward Street and Barnards in St George's Road. In Jack Ball's secondhand shop you could buy anything from Ex-Govt bits and pieces to a set of bike handlebars or an old wireless set.
I bought a fourteen valver there once but never go it to work! Many shillings was spent in there.
Barnards was primarily a radio shop but was also the local agent for Trix Twin Railways and I used to buy bits for my Trix train set there. I also joined the Trix Club and got a magazine several times a year with lots of shunting puzzles and Trix news in it.
I always wanted the double ended railcar but at about £4/19/6d it was more than my meagre budget. I think they also sold Hornby Dublo and other models and things like violin strings etc.
I remember the crowds outside on Coronation Day 1953 watching it on the television sets in the window. Reception wasn't very good in Brighton then because of the Downs although I think the Truleigh Hill booster had opened earlier in the year.
Also the junk shops in the Lanes where I bought my first organ in 1955, a Karn American Organ for the princely sum of £2/10/0.
Unfortunately as remarked elsewhere shops like that don't exist any more, I suppose killed off firstly by boot sales and now by the 'net.
I bought a radio controlled motor boat for my son in a model shop in Horsham, still got it in the loft waiting for the grandchildren!
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Craggs
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« Reply #33 on: July 27, 2017, 18:25:04 PM »

Many years ago we used to live near Feltham, Middlesex.  My two brothers and I used to go to school in Ashford which was about a 30 minute walk (at our pace) and although we were 5, 6 and 7 year olds we did it on our own.  Half way between Feltham and Ashford was a small parade of shops, one of which was an old fashioned 'model shop'. 

My brothers and I used to love looking at the pictures on the boxes of Airfix model kits..... expensive ones which we could never afford.... and then draw them when we got home after school.

The only ones we could afford were the small models that didn't even come in a box, they were in a small plastic bag with a fold over cardboard fastening at the top.  They cost, to the best of my recollection, 50p a go.

The shop existed all the time that I lived in that area.

The only shop that I know which would mirror this is now in Dorking, Surrey.  "Dorking Models" is in the 'one-way' system and sits amongst the antique shops.  The last time I drove past I saw a huge model of a German Coastal Gun, it must have been 3' long - I had to stop and look - it was brilliant, the detail was amazing.

 
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PNK
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« Reply #34 on: July 27, 2017, 20:42:47 PM »

I would still be modelling if all the shops hadn't closed. Browsing always ended in a purchase. Between 2001 and 2006 I worked in Colindale - a hell of a commute - and outside Colindale Station was Hannants. I had 5 years of modelling although the scale had to be upped to 1/35 and switched from aircraft to tanks and AFV's. Eyesight problems!

The bagged ones were at one point 1/9d but I think they went up to 2/6d but when the money went all funny it became 17½p. It was one of the many huge price hikes that happened in 1971. Luckily I had a Saturday job so was already buying the bigger kits, although I never went as far as a B-29 or Sunderland.

The prices I quoted are from memory and will therefore be less than accurate Smiley I am now thinking the 2/6d was 2/9d!

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alkhamhills
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« Reply #35 on: July 27, 2017, 20:47:37 PM »

When aged 6/7 in the late 1940s, my father would take me with him on Saturday mornings to his office, . On the way home we would stop at a hairdressers at Buckland, Dover for our fortnightly haircut Think cost  was 6d..Also remember visiting Bobbys in Folkestone and spending my 6d pocket money   
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pomme homme
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« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2017, 21:18:56 PM »

Fortnightly haircut! My mother used to have to drag me to the barber shop on the parade in Langley Green. She considered that she'd done well if she got me in there once every six months!
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Tim Sargeant
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« Reply #37 on: July 27, 2017, 22:11:25 PM »

The 'price hikes' mentioned above in 1971. Decimalisation; Ever since I started messing about with cars sparking plugs were 5/- (25 new pence) So you got a set of four for a pound.
Along came decimalisation and they suddenly became 30p, £1=20 for a set of four. Of course you could still then get the cheaper Wipac ones for 3/6 but they soon disappeared altogether.
Around the same time; North Sea Oil! Petrol was going to be so cheap they were almost going to give it to you as what they said they really wanted was the petrochemicals.
Fuel was to be just a by-product. Petrol went from four gallons for a pound to only three gallons for a pound. Etc. Etc.
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PNK
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« Reply #38 on: July 27, 2017, 22:22:49 PM »

I have only just started to use a traditional barber again after over 30 years of unisex (booking only) and then DIY No.4. I haven't had a a parting for at least 15 years! My first barbers was at the back of the sweet shop in New Eltham but after starting secondary school I had to get it cut on my own and by 1970 one old ex Army barber had put a sign in the window "NO LONG HAIR". By 1973 I had long hair but got it cut in time for my A levels. I got wolf whistles from the Spanish Men whilst on holiday in Spain when it was long!

The only thing I hated about barbers was the long wait and trying to remember who came in before or after you. Sometimes it was over two hours! These days the barber is a rare thing and so the queuing problem is not as great sometimes it's as many as one in front of me Smiley
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Longpockets
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« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2017, 00:46:57 AM »

I can remember when having been taken to the barbers having to sit on a padded plank across the arms of the barbers chair. Gentlemen would enter the shop while I was having my hair cut and the barber would reach into a cupboard by the the sink and pass something to them and money would change hands.

" Anything for the weekend sir ? "

1950's
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