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Author Topic: Edward Thomas  (Read 2193 times)
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2014, 17:17:16 PM »

Recently found that Matthew Hollis has also edited an anthology titled 'Edward Thomas-Selected Poems' Faber & Faber 2011, which includes some extracts from Thomas' prose writing.
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2014, 11:03:11 AM »

Should just mention that the recent 'W.H.Davies' (William Henry Davies) thread mentions Edward Thomas.

http://sussexhistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=6587.0

Davies also wrote this poem in memory of his friend Edward Thomas who was killed in action on the Western Front 9th April 1917

" Killed in action
(EDWARD THOMAS)

Happy the man whose home is still
In Nature's green and peaceful ways;
To wake and hear the birds so loud,
That scream for joy to see the sun
Is shouldering past a sullen cloud.

And we have known those days, when we
Would wait to hear the cuckoo first;
When you and I, with thoughtful mind,
Would help a bird to hide her nest,
For fear of other hands less kind.

But thou, my friend, art lying dead:
War, with its hell-born childishness,
Has claimed thy life, with many more:
The man that loved this England well,
And never left it once before."

http://www.greenfolder.co.nz/WHD/poetry/killedinaction.html

This website based in New Zealand also has more information about W H Davies

http://www.greenfolder.co.nz/WHD/

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MichaelBully
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« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2014, 22:44:41 PM »

Thought must just return to this thread !
The Poetry Society are calling on the nation to celebrate 'Adelstrop' on 23rd June 2014 !

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"23 June 1914... we stopped at Adlestrop, through the willows could be heard a chain of blackbirds' songs at 12.45, and one thrush and no man seen, only a hiss of engine letting off steam..." From the journals of Edward Thomas.

100 years ago, on 23 June 1914 at 12.45pm, Edward Thomas's train pulled 'unwontedly' at the railway station at Adlestrop. The rest is poetry history. Let's celebrate.

Here's how: For example, send us your poem inspired by 'Adlestrop', or perhaps film/record yourself reciting the original poem, or simply send us your thoughts and feelings about the poem... or surprise us! Email membership @ poetrysociety.org.uk and we'll compile everyone's feedback on this page and publish it on social media at 12.45pm on Monday 23 June.

Twitter followers: At 12.45pm precisely on Monday 23 June 2014 we want you to tweet, describing what you can hear at that exact moment. Car horns? Laughter? Babies crying? Your own heartbeat? Blackbirds singing? Use the hashtag #BlackbirdSang, and copy us in @PoetrySociety . If you're not on Twitter, email membership @ poetrysociety.org.uk and we'll tweet for you "

http://www.poetrysociety.org.uk/content/adlestrop/
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2014, 23:12:50 PM »

The 23 June was my late Mother's birthday.  I never thought of the connection between this and Thomas' poem, or even whether she was aware of it herself.  If she was, she never told me - she hated too much fuss and attention!
Now, of course, I regret not writing this out for her on a birthday card - and I learned calligraphy, too!
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2014, 14:23:54 PM »

There's a fascinating documentary to listen to on National Archives website about 'Adelstrop'  Presented by Bruno Derrick

'Adlestrop by Edward Thomas is one of the nation’s favourite poems. Written in the heat of battle by an officer who was doomed not to survive the war, Adlestrop idealises the stillness of a railway station in an English country village before the First World War. This podcast will consider the literary and military career of Edward Thomas, the impact of the railways on the English countryside at the start of the 20th century and whether or not 1914 really does represent the culmination of the ‘Long Edwardian Summer’

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/adlestrop-railways-poetry-and-the-myths-of-1914/

Interesting.  I thought that the  'Long Edwardian Summer' of 1914 was a myth  invented by Philip Larkin. Certainly Bruno Derrick wasn't afraid to challenge some myths and preconceptions.

Reminds me that Thomas was said to be strongly influenced by  Hilaire Belloc -  the 'Poet Laureate of Sussex' according to 'Sussex Life' magazine.
Interesting feature on Belloc here   http://www.sussexlife.co.uk/people/the_sussex_poet_laureate_hilaire_belloc_remembered_1_2231378
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Icare9
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« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2014, 19:14:03 PM »

Is there any chance that "Adelstrop" is a bit of an anagram of Port(i)slade?
Did he have any connection to there?
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2014, 14:25:58 PM »

I don't think so on either account ! 'Adelstrop' really exists !

Is there any chance that "Adelstrop" is a bit of an anagram of Port(i)slade?
Did he have any connection to there?
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2014, 09:55:47 AM »

Jolly good play about Edward Thomas is now being staged at West Meon, Hampshire: Really worth seeing.

 " On 25, 26, 27, 28, 30 June and 1 and 2 July there is a production of the excellent play about Edward Thomas - The Dark Earth & The Light Sky by Nick Dear taking place in an Indian style tent at 8pm at The Thomas Lord pub in West Meon. Tickets, from £13, are available from www.westmeontheatre.co.uk Pre theatre suppers can be booked at The Thomas Lord 01730 829244. "
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #23 on: June 29, 2014, 17:36:10 PM »

Great new blog about Edward Thomas here -http://edwardthomaspoetry.wordpress.com/

Particularly fascinated by the page on the 'Hampshire Hangers' and Thomas' connection to this district.

http://edwardthomaspoetry.wordpress.com/walks/
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #24 on: September 01, 2014, 12:23:05 PM »

There's a lunch time talk on Edward Thomas by Professor Edna Longley

 " The Poetry of Edward Thomas: Edna Longley
Winchester Discovery Centre
12:00pm Sunday 14 Sep 2014
12noon - 1pm

In association with Edward Thomas Fellowship and Jon Monkcom of Wessex Group

Professor Edna Longley is a leading authority on the life and work of Hampshire poet Edward Thomas, and in this lecture she shares her enthusiasm for this most influential of authors.

Cost: £10 / £8 concession
Venue: Winchester Discovery Centre
Telephone: 01962 873603 "

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/wdc/wdc-eventdetails?id=230860
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #25 on: September 01, 2014, 12:27:46 PM »

Just found another talk on Edward Thomas by Edna Longley at Steep, Thursday 11th September !


All Saints Church, Steep, Hampshire GU32 2DD
Edward Thomas Lecture
by Edna Longley, Professor Emerita, Queen's University, Belfast
'Inhabiting Steep:
Houses in the Poetry of Edward Thomas'
Thursday, 11th September
7.30 pm
Free entry. Retiring collection
www.steepfroxfield.com
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2015, 22:20:11 PM »

New Edward Thomas biography by Jean Moorcroft Wilson, who has already written major biographies on Siegfried Sassoon and  Isaac Rosenberg will be published on 21st May 2015. Titled 'Edward Thomas:from Adelstrop- Arras ' , Bloomsbury Continuim, ISBN  9781408187142
 
Jean Moorcroft Wilson is worth hearing as a live speaker and the aforementioned biographies are quite definitive works, especially as her knowledge of early 20th century culture is so extensive.
 
 
The official publisher's 'blurb' is here . Personally not sure how much of a 'first world war poet'   Thomas actually  was unless one counts being killed in action at Arras as being the event that most  defines his work. But looking forward to this book.
 
" Along with Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, Edward Thomas is by any reckoning a major first world war poet. A war poet is not one who chooses to commemorate or celebrate a war, but one who reacts against having a war thrust upon him. His great friend Robert Frost wrote 'his poetry is so very brave, so unconsciously brave.'

Apart from a most illuminating understanding of his poetry, Dr Wilson shows how Thomas' life alone makes for absorbing reading: his early marriage, his dependence on laudanum, his friendships with Joseph Conrad, Edward Garnett, Rupert Brooke and Hilaire Belloc among others. The novelist Eleanor Farjeon entered into a curious menage a trois with him and his wife. He died in France in 1917, on the first day of the Battle of Arras. This is the stuff of which myths are made and posterity has been quick to oblige. But this has tended to obscure his true worth as a writer, as Dr Wilson argues.

Edward Thomas's poems were not published until some months after his death, but they have never since been out of print. Described by Ted Hughes as 'the father of us all', Thomas's distinctively modern sensibility is probably the one most in tune with our twenty-first century outlook. He occupies a crucial place in the development of twentieth century poetry. This is the extraordinary life of a poetic genius."
 
http://www.bloomsbur...-9781408187135/
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MichaelBully
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« Reply #27 on: June 26, 2015, 20:40:59 PM »

Reading over this thread again ! Thanks again to all who posted. I am reviewing the Jean Moorcroft Wilson  Edward Thomas biography for the Siegfried Sassoon Fellowship.

Managed to locate a link page with regard to Edward Thomas' prose works on line.

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Thomas%2C+Edward%2C+1878-1917

The 'South Country'  (1909)

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b805846;view=1up;seq=1


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alkhamhills
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« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2015, 19:56:39 PM »

Effects of soldiers. See pic. All left to his widow

There are 2 attachment(s) in this post which you cannot view or download
thom 1.jpg
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Man of Kent1
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« Reply #29 on: June 28, 2015, 18:39:33 PM »

It's still very sad to see a life's worth written as a ledger entry!
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