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Author Topic: WWII Aspidistra & Home Office RGHQ 6.1 site at King's Standing.  (Read 8381 times)
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elmo
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« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2012, 19:13:04 PM »

Hi,when I left school in 1980 I started work as a trainee welder with AJ Johnson (Steel Fabrications) from Eastbourne.
I was only there for 3 months from May to July but during that time I remember going to the Aspidistra site to help fit a hand rail to a steel staircase at the rear of the transmitter.
We were shown down to the ornate plastered transmiter hall by a site maintenance man who stayed with us all the time we were there.
I remember the transmiter was working while we worked behind it as it was gently humming away,so we asked the maintenance man how powerful it was.......what happened next I shall never forget.
The maintenance man produced a 4' flourescent tube and when he held it close to the back of the transmitter it lit up without being plugged into anything!!......he said that the transmitter was enough static electricity to light the tube.
At 16 years old I was very impressed.
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daveSea
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« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2013, 19:01:24 PM »

Here are some pictures taken today (7th Sep 2013) Sussex police are still using the building.

There is a noticeboard with various articles detailing the history of the site and these two plans, which because of the
lighting were very difficult to photograph , the first one shows the second level.


 
 


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Dave
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« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2013, 19:18:55 PM »

Here are some more pictures
I'm told the first one - the concrete block held the stays supporting the aerial mast
The second one I think is dragons tooth - this is one the opposite side of the road from the guard house there lots of these hiding in the bracken.
The third one shows an emergency exit
Forth one above ground

If any of my descriptions are incorrect please fell free to comment, WW11 is not my speciality.  
 
  


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Dave
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« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2013, 19:30:58 PM »

A few more photos

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Dave
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WWW
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2013, 20:05:23 PM »

Before the RCG was built it was operated by the Foreign Office and the site known as Crows Nest. There used to be about 15-20 aerials standing. Like a mini Daventry.
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Cptpies
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WWW
« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2013, 08:12:14 AM »

Dave

I'd say the dragons teeth are more recent than WWII, they are too small, sharp edged and obviously mobile to be from that era. Although they obviously serve a similar purpose to stop people parking up and goggling.
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Weebouy
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« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2014, 21:58:20 PM »

Good story about a strange establishment.  In the 70s, driving my patrol car around the Kingstanding transmitter meant drowning out all police broadcasts and replacing them with many foreign languages destined for Foreign Office global locations. My memory of the station remains the wonderful art-deco designs everywhere. The main entrance was known to staff as 'The Cinema' as it looked just like a 1930s Odeon!  I can see the site from the back of my home now!
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Weebouy
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« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2014, 15:35:28 PM »

I spotted these this morning, mostly hidden in bracken. They form a right angle with four on one leg and seven on the other immediately adjacent to the B2026 at Duddleswell.
They are located directly opposite the entrance to the old wartime radio station subject of 'Aspidistra' - see photo. There are a few also by the roadside either side of the gate to the station. They are also within a few feet of the site of the exposed section of 'agger' forming part of the old Roman Road known as the Lewes Way, and in fact I believe that one may be standing in the centre of the roadway! History covering 1900 years exposed in a few square yards. What struck me was the almost new condition they were in, with no 'weathering' at all, despite over 70 years of exposure. It seems conceivable that these lumps of concrete will still be obvious another 1900 years from now!  

  

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Weebouy
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« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2014, 20:56:39 PM »

The 'teeth' are unquestionably WW2 as the Ashdown Forest guide describes them as being placed in around 1940, to protect important sites from British tanks - not German! There is evidence of a concrete base, much broken up, within the 'teeth', presumably for some sort of building worthy of protection.  Much of this area was used for training (and still is) and as far away as Crowborough town environs, there is still evidence of concreted paths in the St Johns area where tanks could hide in the woods. I have been walking my dogs here for years and never noticed them until today! Perhaps joining this forum makes one more observant!
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bumble
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« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2017, 15:00:06 PM »

Does have anybody have any details of Americans who probably  came  in 1942 to install Asptidtistra. They wore uniforms and lodged in the Hatch Inn at Colemans Hatch. It may be possible they were RCA employees' who built Aspridistra. I did find Harold Kilner Robin who was the engineer flying from Lisbon to New York on 1st June 1941, he was a civil servant and radio engineer
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