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Author Topic: Lewes Naval Prison  (Read 1948 times)
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John
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« on: June 04, 2014, 15:43:51 PM »

A few very old photographs of the exterior of Lewes Naval Prison..

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pomme homme
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2014, 22:32:57 PM »

Whereabouts in Lewes was it?
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Longpockets
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2014, 19:35:27 PM »

Whereabouts in Lewes was it?

Market Street leads to North Street, where is the old Naval Prison, built in 1793 as the town jail and now used as a Territorial head-quarters.

The old county jail was used to house a hundred Russian prisoners of the Crimean war, (fn. 237) and the officers on their release wrote a letter of thanks for their treatment to the senior constable. (fn. 238)

This building became a naval prison. A number of details about this 'house of correction', which was completed in 1793, are available. (fn. 239) The developments in Lewes government in the latter part of the century will be noticed later.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=56908

Walls of Old Naval Prison - 8 Lancaster Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1TY

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-293272-walls-of-old-naval-prison-lewes-east-sus

Location here -

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-293272-walls-of-old-naval-prison-lewes-east-sus/osmap

Any help?

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pomme homme
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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2014, 21:21:54 PM »

Thank you, Longpockets. And I suppose inevitably there is another question, namely why did Lewes - an inland town with no obvious connection to the Royal Navy - have a naval prison?
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Longpockets
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2014, 19:32:02 PM »


From here - http://www.godfreydykes.info/NAVAL%20PRISONS%20AND%20NAVAL%20DETENTION%20QUARTERS.htm

Prior to the opening of RNP (Royal Naval Prison) Lewes and RNP Bodmin naval personnel were imprisoned in Civil Jails, Maidstone, Winchester and Exeter over which the Navy had no control. The Admiralty wanted their own prisons, therefore Lewes because it was halfway between Chatham & Portsmouth and Bodmin to cover Portland Devonport/Plymouth.

The above web site is worth a read as well.

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pomme homme
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« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2014, 09:13:08 AM »

Thank you, again, Longpockets. The website http://www.godfreydykes.info/NAVAL%20PRISONS%20AND%20NAVAL%20DETENTION%20QUARTERS.htm is interesting but rather eclectic and you have to search carefully to find information about RNP Lewes. But it's worth a look, nonetheless.
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John
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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2014, 17:01:14 PM »

Isle of Wight Observer - Saturday 28 April 1855

Escape and Recapture of Another Russian Prisoner.- About 5 o'clock on Thursday afternoon another of the prisoners confined in Lewes War Prison succeeded in effecting his escape, which he appears to have done in the same manner as the three whose escape and capture was reported in the Times of March 29th, namely, by climbing to the roof of the guardhouse, and thence to the wall, the top of which in that particular place is only about 10 or 12 feet from the ground. The guardhouse is situated at the upper end of the outer yard, and as the ground rises there is a flight of steps in the path leading to the back yard, close to the higher corner the guardhouse, the roof of which is only a few feet from the ground above the steps, while from the other side of it the top of the outer wall, against which it abuts, is easily accessible.

The exact period at which the prisoner made his escape is not known, but as soon as he was missed warders and pensioners were turned out for a hunt, which was, however, of short duration, for by some means some of the party obtained information that the fugitive was ensconced in the King's Arms, a public-house not far from the prison, and on the pursuers' arrival there they discovered the runaway making himself comfortable over half-a-pint of rum, which he had ordered. He was immediately captured, and marched back under guard to the prison, where he will expiate his offence in solitary confinement and low diet. The whole of the prisoners are frequently taken out by Lieutenant Mann, R.N., the Governor, and small parties of the non-commissioned officers are allowed to roam where they please, attended by only one warder as a guard.
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Weebouy
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2014, 18:53:11 PM »


Interesting Daily Telegraph report here relating to prisoners of war at Lewes Naval Prison during the Crimea War.

 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/finland/10333465/One-of-Britains-most-unusual-war-memorials-renovated-by-Russians-and-Finns.html
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2017, 14:51:07 PM »

GERMAN PRISONERS GOING.
We are now rapidly getting rid of the remaining German prisoners who have been held in this country. Transport has, of course, been a difficulty, but, I understand, we are within sight now of the end of the business of repatriation. The other day a considerable number of German prisoners from Lewes passed through London on their way to the Fatherland, and I must say that they showed no signs of being "any the worse for their detention amongst us -which is more than can be said for a good many of our poor fellows who have come home from German prison camps. These particular prisoners had been working on the land in Sussex, and, I am told, had worked very well, so that when they were marched on "foot through the town of Lewes there was nothing in the way of unfriendly demonstration.

Amman Valley Chronicle 6/11/1919

Some 200 prisoners of war who have been quartered at Lewes Naval Prison since March, 1917, have left for Germany.

Abergavenny Chromnicle 7/11/1919
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