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Author Topic: Harvey's Shipyard, Littlehampton.  (Read 332 times)
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Weebouy
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« on: June 30, 2014, 22:38:03 PM »

Date unknown. Guess 19thC

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John
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2018, 16:17:12 PM »

Portsmouth Evening News - Saturday 14 April 1923

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pomme homme
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2018, 17:35:17 PM »

This was the best part of four years after the last vessel came off the stocks in Harvey's Shipyard. The history of the yard is related in the Shoreham Herald of 3 April 2014:

Quote
Henry Harvey came to Littlehampton from Rye, in East Sussex, in 1846, and rented some space in Stephen Oliver’s successful shipyards on the western side of the River Arun. Harvey was a ship-builder and a master craftsman, and under his management, the yard soon acquired a reputation for finely-built vessels that was to remain connected with the name of Harvey for the next 70 years. As an important local business owner, Henry Harvey’s name also crops up in other areas; for example, he appears to have been instrumental in saving the project to get the Congregational church built. The land in the High Street had been leased for the purpose by the Duke of Norfolk in 1859, but construction was put on hold when one of the project managers, Samuel Evershed, a local timber merchant and Deacon of Arundel Church, died in 1858. Harvey, alongside Evershed’s son and a man named Thomas Duke, fought to revive the project, with work beginning again in 1861 when the foundation stone was laid. Henry’s last few years were troubled with ill-health, but when he died in 1868 two of his sons, John and William Benjamin, were already heavily involved with carrying the business forward and continuing their father’s legacy. Under Henry’s sons, the yards went from strength to strength, with the yard continuing to build the high- quality wooden ocean sailing ships, then in big demand. At one point, Messers John and William Harvey were building four ships a year and employing more than 100 men. Harveys’ shipyard continued to flourish into the 19th century, with the brothers turning their attention to repair work and building ketch barges for the coastal trade, when the demand for wooden ships petered out. John Harvey continued to oversee the business until well into his 70s. The last Harvey boat was built in 1919.

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pomme homme
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« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2018, 17:47:45 PM »

The clipper brig Emma, newly launched and standing off Harvey's Yard, Littlehampton, where she was built in 1866. A photograph of another of Harvey's products, the brigantine Abeja, can be seen here.

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