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Author Topic: Love thy enemy..  (Read 2669 times)
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John
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« on: October 08, 2014, 08:34:14 AM »

Dover Express - Friday 30 May 1947

TWO MONTHS FOR DOVER WOMAN.

HELPED GERMAN PRISONER.

Mrs. Dorothy Catherine Brown, (28), wife of a miner, of Elms Vale Rd., Dover, was at Bow St. on Saturday, sentenced by Mr. Dunne, to two months imprisonment for giving assistance to Helmut Guth (28), an escaped German prisoner of war, with intent to hinder or interfere with his apprehension. She pleaded not guilty.

P.C. Lee said that Mrs. Brown got off a Dover coach at Victoria with a man whom he recognised as an escaped German prisoner of war. The man was arrested and Mrs. Brown voluntarily accompanied him to the police station. On the way the man handed her a £1 note. in reply to questions, Mrs. Brown said, "It is my money. I gave him £2 this morning on the bus." She also said that she had given him her husband's identity card with the £2. When formally charged, she said, "He is a friend of mine, why shouldn't I help him."

Mrs. Brown told the Court that before moving to Dover last November, she and her husband lived at Blakeney, in Gloucestershire, and her husband brought Guth home. Quite unexpectedly Guth met her in the street at Dover on May 10th. He stayed for a week in lodgings, which she found for him. He asked if she would lend him her husband's identity card for a passport application, but she refused. She did not know he had the identity card. At the time of her arrest last week she was on her way to Blackpool for a holiday and Guth accompanied her to London. She did not know he was an escaped prisoner of war.

Mr. L E Barker (defending): Did he ever tell you of his feelings towards you?—

He asked me on several occasions to leave my husband and go away. I refused and told him I was perfectly happy with my husband.

Det.-Sergt. Irvine said there was no doubt that Guth was infatuated with Mrs. Brown.
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2014, 08:36:35 AM »

Dover Express - Friday 05 July 1946

At Maidstone Assizes, on Thursday last week, Mrs. Evelyn Laura Brownson, 158, Park Road, Upper Deal, was sent to prison for nine months on three counts of encouraging a 15-years-old girl to have immoral relations with a German prisoner of war.
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2014, 08:49:38 AM »

Hastings and St Leonards Observer - Saturday 31 August 1918

FAIR-HAIRED GERMAN.

LETTERS FOUND AT HASTINGS.

WADHURST WIFE'S INFATUATION.

Quite a sensation has been caused in Wadhurst by the charge made against Elizabeth Lorraine Gibb. wife of the landlord of the Railway Hotel, of having without lawful authority conveyed to a prisoner war, named Hermann, certain letters and packets of cigarettes which were likely to interfere with the discipline and administration of the place of detention of Hermann and other prisoners. The case was heard at the Mark Cross Petty Sessions on Tuesday. Mr. G. F. Donne, of Brighton, appeared for the prosecution. When asked to plead the defendant said "It remains to be seen, does it not?"

Mr. Donne said the defendant was a young married woman and she had written letters to the German prisoner, without the knowledge of her husband, who was the licensee of the Railway Hotel, letters which were of an impassioned nature and which reached him without her having even spoken to him. Her passion apparently carried her away that she went so far as to corrupt a Corporal of the guard in the camp by paying him 10s. for the delivery of each letter. She made an attempt to meet the German and she also sent him cigarettes. Mr. Donne proceeded to read several of the letters, one of which commenced "My dearest boy." In another she wrote: "All I wanted was to talk to you. I never realised that true love was so much before. On Tuesday morning I received your letter, which undoubtedly I deserved, but I will not answer now. Please don't write again so angry with me. I don't feel the same way as you dear.—Ever yours. Betty." A further letter read :— "Dearest H.— Can I thank you enough for your last letter? It proved what true love and affection was. Patience is what we must have. How I long for an extra hug and kiss. I have written E.T. (English Tommy) explaining to him where it is, so if you carefully seal the envelope he will send it on to me.— From your devoted and true Betty."

In another letter Mr. Donne stated the defendant apparently looked forward to the time when the prisoner and she could be husband and wife. The German in reply to one of the letters wrote:— "Dear Miss,— Come and see me if you like. I am working alone at the other end of the tunnel opposite the station. I will be very glad and thankful to you if you can get a bottle of whiskey for me. I have had nothing of it for a long time. The proper and best time to meet is between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. Dear miss, I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you again.— Yours very truly, Hermann." The letters, stated Mr. Donne, were secreted in a palliasse which came from the particular camp in which the German prisoner was confined.

The Chairman of the Bench said they considered it a very serious offence, and she would have to go to prison for three months with hard labour. Upon hearing the sentence the defendant waived her hand to friends at the back of the Court and taking off her wristlet watch handed it to someone near.
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2014, 08:57:34 AM »

Dover Express - Friday 30 August 1946

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE "LALUN."

WOMAN IMPRISONED FOR YACHT THEFT.

Mrs. Doris Violet Blake and the German prisoner-of-war, who were arrested at Calais last week, following their attempt to reach the Continent in a yacht which disappeared from Dover Harbour, were returned to Dover during the week-end. Mrs. Blake arrived on the s.s."Canterbury," on Friday evening, and Alexander Todt, the German, in a B.A.O.R ship, on Saturday afternoon.

(Details of the theft skipped..)

He (defending solicitor) had Mrs. Blake's permission to tell the Court — he regretted having to do so, but it was necessary — about her domestic life. She was unhappily married, and divorce proceedings against her husband were pending, and the escapade with the yacht was a runaway with a German, whom she intended to settle down with in Germany. Mr. Mowll added that the magistrates knowing that human side of the case might be able to take more lenient view, where otherwise they might have dealt with her severely.
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2014, 17:16:00 PM »

Sussex Express - Friday 13 June 1947

Lost For Words.

I dare say a certain section of the community will try to tear me to pieces, but as I was travelling along the Lewes-Newhaven road last Sunday afternoon I saw something which thoroughly disgusted me. It was a German prisoner of war walking hand-in-hand with a girl who was evidently a local village maiden, and who was smiling up into his face as if she thought the world of him.
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« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2016, 18:56:27 PM »

Surrey Advertiser - Wednesday 14 August 1918

GIFTS TO GERMAN PRISONERS.
 
Gladys Hall, 20, and Mary Elizabeth Gordon, 25, members of the W.R.N.S., stationed at Farnborough, were fined three guineas each at Aldershot on Monday for interfering with a place of detention for prisoners of war. Evidence was given that in Gordon's room a letter had been found in which it was stated by German prisoners that they had gratefully received a gift of cigarettes. Both girls had approached the detention camp and repeatedly made signs to two prisoners. Gordon was stated to have told a member of the W.R.N.S. Corps that the German prisoners were "fine-looking boys" and "real men," and that she did not see why they should not have cigarettes. Defendants admitted receiving the letter. The Magistrate said it was a most serious case, but he did not think the accused realised the position of things: hence the light penalty.
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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2018, 17:39:30 PM »

Kent & Sussex Courier - Friday 07 April 1944

UNLAWFUL BENEVOLENCE

John Tanner Neve, Marlborough, Wilts, pleaded not guilty to committing an offence against Article 3 of the Prisoners of War and Internees (Access and Communications) Order, 1940, without lawful authority, by despatching to a prisoner of war a quantity of cigarettes at Benenden on 6th January.

The solicitor for the prosecution said that Sergt. E. McGuire, R.A.M.C., was in the Bull Hotel, and got in conversation with the defendant, which eventually turned to a German airman who had baled out and was in hospital. Defendant asked if the airman was progressing satisfactorily and if he smoked. The sergeant said he did not know. Neve then asked the sergeant if he would take some cigarettes to the airman, and purchased a packet of 20 at the hotel. The sergeant was reluctant to take them, but eventually did so, and subsequently reported the matter to his superior officer, to whom he handed the cigarettes. Neve justified his action on the grounds of humanity. Defendant had been a major in the Army and should know the proper procedure. If he wanted to do something of this kind for a prisoner of war he should have approached the Commanding Officer.

Evidence was given by Sergt. E. McGuire, Capt. J. D. Allen, hospital Chaplain, and Detective-Sergt. C. C. Vincent, of Marlborough.

Defendant said he was quite careful to say to the sergeant that the cigarettes purchased should be taken to the ward officer, as he knew the regulations.

The Chairman said the Bench thought that he had no bad intentions and dismissed the case under the First Offenders' Act.

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