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Author Topic: Upnor Castle  (Read 1277 times)
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cliveh
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« on: September 21, 2011, 12:53:01 PM »

Upnor Castle was ordered to be built by Queen Elizabeth I in 1559 to protect warships moored in the River Medway. Construction began that year and the first stage was completed in 1564. Further development took place between 1599-1601 including building a timber pallisade in the river to strengthen the water bastion defences.
 
By 1623 the castle held 15 guns of various sizes but these failed to protect the Fleet from a serious attack by the Dutch in 1667 in which many ships were destroyed and the flagsghip, 'HMS Royal Charles' was captured and towed away to Holland.
 
Later that year a Royal Warrant ordered the castle to be strengthened. Then in 1668, following the end of hostilities with the Dutch, it was converted into a place of stores holding hundreds of barrels of gunpowder. Barracks were added in 1718 and then in 1891 the castle was transfered from the war Office to the Admiralty continuing in service as a magazine and stores until 1945.

cliveh

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John
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« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2011, 18:30:23 PM »

Part of a plan of the ground floor of Upnor Castle, dated 1963.

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Longpockets
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2015, 20:40:34 PM »


Not sure what the item is in photograph 4, any suggestions.


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Longpockets
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2015, 20:47:59 PM »

Photographs of the first floor barracks rooms which I believe were only accessible from April this year.

Poor old Clive of India looks bit lost in picture 1. Looks as if he may have had a drink no wonder he rode a camel at least you have something to hang on to.

The sensitive presentation is pleasing, at least they have left what remains of the original decorations and features. The Victorian electric heaters realy set it off.

These were just the front two rooms and a Victorian extension to the rear. Hopefully we may have access to the rest of the building at some point when funds are available. Might be a while though.


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Icare9
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2015, 23:53:09 PM »

I thought it rather unkind of you to refer to our cliveh as Clive of India, even if he does have his likeness propped against the fireplace!

This is another of those annoying topics where I say to myself "I've been wanting to dig into that aspect of history" and never gone further.
The reference to The Royal Charles intrigued me, she seem to have been the Royal Navy's first flagship....

Wiki says
Royal Charles was an 80-gun first-rate three-decker ship of the line of the English Navy. She was originally called Naseby, built by Peter Pett, and launched at Woolwich dockyard in 1655, for the navy of the Commonwealth of England, and named in honour of Sir Thomas Fairfax's decisive 1645 victory over the Royalist forces during the English Civil Wars. She was ordered in 1654 as one of a programme of four second rates, intended to carry 60 guns each. However, she was altered during construction to mount a complete battery of guns along the upper deck (compared with the partial battery on this deck of her intended sisters, on which there were no gunports in the waist along this deck), and so was reclassed as a first rate.

In the run-up to the Restoration of the monarchy during June 1660 she was anchored in The Downs off Deal, where her laurel-crowned figurehead of Oliver Cromwell was removed before sailing to the Dutch Republic at the head of the fleet sent to bring King Charles II back to England, captained by Sir Edward Montagu and still under her Parliamentary name. On arrival in Scheveningen she was renamed HMS Royal Charles and took Charles and his entourage (including Samuel Pepys) on board, landing them at Dover.

Under her new name, she thus joined the Royal Navy which formally came into being in 1660. At 1,229 tons, Naseby was larger than Sovereign of the Seas, the first three-deck ship of the line, built by Phineas Pett, Peter's father. Unlike Sovereign of the Seas, which was in service from 1637 to 1697, Naseby was to enjoy only twelve years in service.

As Royal Charles she took part in the Second Anglo-Dutch War. In 1665 she fought in the Battle of Lowestoft under the command of the Lord High Admiral, James Stuart, Duke of York, her captain being Sir William Penn. During that battle she probably destroyed the Dutch flagship Eendracht. In 1666 she participated in two further actions, the Four Days Battle and the defeat of Admiral Michiel de Ruyter in the St. James's Day Battle off the North Foreland.

In 1667, flagging English national morale was further depressed by the Raid on the Medway in which a Dutch fleet invaded the Thames and Medway rivers and on 12 June captured the uncommissioned (decommissioned?) Royal Charles, removing her with great skill to Hellevoetsluis in the United Provinces. The Dutch did not take her into naval service because it was considered that she drew too much water for general use on the Dutch coast. She was auctioned for scrap in 1673.

Her metal stern piece, showing the English coat of arms with a lion and unicorn) along with her white ensign, is now on display in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.
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Longpockets
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« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2015, 21:28:17 PM »

The river elevation of the lower section showing evidence of what is possibly where a wooden structure was positioned externally. There is evidence of chasing either side of the door and what I think are called corbels where timber was supported off the wall.


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« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2015, 09:43:38 AM »

View from the muddy bank..

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Tim Sargeant
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2016, 11:33:59 AM »

In 2011 my wife took me on a trip up and down the River Medway on the sailing barge 'Edith May' for one of my birthdays.
Here is a photo of Upnor Castle taken from the barge as we passed by. A good day out when the weather is OK as it was that day.
Edith May does various sailing trips and competes in the Thames barge matches etc. During the winter off season she is moored up
and used as a tea room and is also available for private charters.
Very similar view to the first one above.

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PNK
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2017, 16:46:04 PM »

Went there last week. It was not full of furniture or much else but was interesting despite this. The street you walk down to get there is also very picturesque and I gather one of the pubs does excellent food.
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