Author Topic: All Saints, Petham  (Read 115 times)

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Offline John

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All Saints, Petham
« on: February 01, 2024, 15:00:03 pm »
Whitstable Times - Saturday 01 April 1922

PETHAM CHURCH DESTROYED BY FIRE.

LACK OF WATER HAMPERS OPERATIONS OF FIREMEN.


The 13th century church of All Saints, Petham, about four miles south of Canterbury, was destroyed by fire on Sunday afternoon, only the chancel and the south-west tower remaining. The edifice was actually in course of restoration, and £200 had only recently been spent in the renovation of the roof of the nave. The tower is in such a cracked and shaky condition that it will probably have to be demolished.

The usual morning service had been held, and the church was locked up at 12.30 apparently quite safe. About 2 o'clock, however, an alarm of fire was raised and the Canterbury fire brigades were telephoned for, the vicar (the Rev. C. G. Clairmonte) and many willing helpers in the meantime securing in safety most of the church furniture and removable property. The valuable church records in the safe were also removed to eafety, as was the oak parish war memorial, and on the derelict walls of the nave are to be seen many intact but blackened ancient memorial tablets. The six bells were entirely melted and the belfry was gutted, while the organ, which stood in the chancel, was almost irreparably damaged. The stained glass in the east and west windows remains intact.

The great difficulty in combating the flames (the fire was caused by a defective flue) was the scarcity of water, otherwise the firemen would probably have been able to save the building from serious damage.

The church was built of flint and chalk, and had a tower containing a peal of six bells. Its seating accommodation was for 300, and its register dates hack to the year 1559. The living is a vicarage, annexed in 1698 to the vicarage of Waltham and is of the joint net yearly value of £478, with four acres of glebe, with residence. It is in the alternate gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Ashburton. The Rev. C. G. Clairmonte, formerly of King’s College, Nova Scotia, Canada, has held the living since 1919. The church was, of course, fully insured.
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell

Offline John

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Re: All Saints, Petham
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2024, 15:03:01 pm »
Dover Express - Friday 21 April 1922

PETHAM CHURCH FIRE SEQUEL.

THIRTEENTH CENTURY CROSSES FOUND.


There is an interesting sequel to the fire which recently gutted All Saints' Church, Petham, near Canterbury. During the examination of the walls, with a view to reconstruction, there was discovered, beneath the layer of plaster, paintings of two consecration crosses in colours, finely preserved, probably of the 13th century period. It is anticipated that from these it will be possible to determine tbe approximate date of the consecration of the Church. Arrangements have been made for the careful removal of all the plaster, and other interesting and, from archaeological point of view, valuable discoveries are expected.

The restoration of the Church will be undertaken by the Canterbury Diocesan Surveyor, Mr. S. W. Gaunt, F.R.I.B.A. The insurance money does not cover the loss sustained, and the Vicar (the Rev. C. G. Clairmonte) is issuing an appeal for subscriptions to the restoration fund.
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell

Offline John

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Re: All Saints, Petham
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2024, 15:10:32 pm »
Whitstable Times - Saturday 31 March 1923

RESTORATION OF PETHAM CHURCH.

DEDICATION BY THE BISHOP OF DOVER


All Saints' Church, Petham, near Canterbury, the thirteenth-century church which was destroyed by fire on March 26th last year, was reopened on Monday evening, the anniversary of the fire. The Bishop of Dover dedicated the new church in the presence of a large congregation. The restoration was begun last July under the direction of Mr. T. F. Grant, F.R.I.B.A. The square tower, near which the fire originated, has been strengthened by three reinforced concrete bands carried round internally. The bells, which were melted, have been recast with as much as was possible of the original metal. The roof has been reconstructed with English oak in the traditional Kent style, with a barrel effect, and tie-beams, carried by new corbels (carved with the emblems of various saints), have been decorated in oolours. The thirteenth-century consecration crosses, found beneath the plaster after the fire, have been used in the decoration of the building. The work has been carried out by Messrs. William Downs, of Walworth, the clerk of the works being Mr. K. B. Miackenzie, A.R.I.B.A. The offertory at the reopening service amounted to £17. The debt remaining on the work of restoration is £300.
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell