Author Topic: Smoking  (Read 6011 times)

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Online Pete

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #60 on: January 19, 2022, 22:22:00 pm »
Bewlays was the tobacconist chain, sold everything smoking related. The one in Maidstone was in the High St roughly opposite the cannon. They closed down in the early '80s.  Neilsons Ice Cream also did cards, being a Canadian firm no doubt they were trying to develop on the US bubble gum card culture.
Sussex Bonfire - a way of life, not just for Nov 5th

Offline Craggs

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #61 on: May 07, 2022, 15:09:00 pm »
A 25 year old "War Souvenir".


Crawley and District Observer - Saturday 28 October 1939

EAST GRINSTEAD

War Souvenir 25-Years Old Cigarettes.


Cigarettes are the type of luxuries which do not stay long in anyone's pocket, but this week one of our representatives was shown a packet of cigarettes which are nearly 25 years old. They are the property of Mr. Horace Gasson, a well-known Earl Grinstead resident, who was recently given them by his mother as a souvenir.

These cigarettes belonged to Mr. Gasson's brother, Lewis Victor (son of the late Mr. C. E. Gasson). Mr. Lewis Gasson, who will be remembered by many of the older residents of the East Grinstead district, joined the 2nd Battalion The Royal Sussex Regiment at the outbreak of the Great War, and at Christmas, 1914, he received, in common with other soldiers at the front at the time, chocolates and cigarettes from Princess Mary in a decorated tin. Unfortunately. Mr. Gasson, never had time to enjoy all these cigarettes, for he was killed in action at Givenchy, near Bethune, on January 29th, 1915, when the Army was under the command of General French.

A friend sent his personal belongings home to his parents and included among them was a packet of cigarettes. It was the packet sent by Princess Mary, and each cigarette bore a crown with "M" underneath, while the wording on the packet was: "Her Royal Highness Princess Mary's Christmas Fund, 1914." There were 20 cigarettes in the packet, but whether this was the original number or whether the packet held 25 we are not in a position to say. It was a paper packing and not of the cardboard variety now used, and is very similar to the packing at present used for American cigarettes. The cigarettes are naturally slightly discoloured, but otherwise they have been well preserved. During all these years they have been kept by the Gasson family. Doubtless many soldiers retained the packing, but It is very improbable whether the cigarettes as well have been kept.

We wonder whether any other readers have interesting souvenirs from the last war.
___________________________________________________________________

Private Lewis Victor Gasson, Royal Sussex Regiment has no known grave and is commemorated on the 'Le Touret memorial'.

His CWGC entry reads :

PRIVATE
LEWIS VICTOR GASSON
Service Number: G/1499
Royal Sussex Regiment
2nd Bn.
Died 30 January 1915
Age 24 years old
Buried or commemorated at LE TOURET MEMORIAL
Additional Info
Son of Clement E. and Esther Gasson, of 161, London Rd., East Grinstead, Sussex.

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #62 on: May 07, 2022, 20:05:49 pm »
Lewes Victor Gasson
Born 1890 Crowhurst

Medal Rolls Index Cards:- To France 11.1.1915. Awarded 15 Star, Victory & British Medals
Soldiers Effects :- Killed at Givenchy. 2nd Batt . £2.6.11 & War Gratuity £3 to mother Esther
Commemorated  Le Touret Memorial.

In 1911 with parents Clement Edward & Esther & brothers Horace Clement & Percy George
At 161 London Rd East Grinstead. he was a Bricklayer. Brothers were Carpenters. Father was a Builder & Contractor


Offline kate

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #63 on: May 08, 2022, 18:06:40 pm »
At my primary school a teacher smoked Players (not during the lessons)

 He bought in all his old fag packets before Christmas so that we could make calendars as a gift for our parents. It was a sort of fanned circle with a little paper calendar in the centre.  Class.

Offline PNK

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #64 on: May 09, 2022, 19:16:19 pm »
I seem to remember making something with a cigarette packet, the ones with the flip lid. I wonder if that was a calendar as you could get a pack of date cards to put in the packet.

I wasn't one of the "cool" kids so I didn't smoke.

Offline Tim of Aclea

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #65 on: October 31, 2023, 19:15:52 pm »
In 1957 the Royal College of Physicians issued their report 'Smoking and Health' on the great health risk attached to smoking, especially of lung cancer.  This was at a time when nearly three quarters men and half of women smoked.  I cannot say how much notice those smokers initially took of the report, but the government did little about it.  I could still buy sweet cigarettes, (I was six at the time) smoking was advertised on TV and there was no question on restricting smoking in public buildings.  Fortunately neither of our parents ever smoked and so neither myself nor my sisters suffered the effects of passive smoking. 

Offline PNK

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #66 on: November 01, 2023, 16:52:19 pm »
Sadly the offices I worked in in from the mid seventies onwards contained many more smokers than non-smokers. You were classed as weird if you didn't smoke. I suspect my chest problems are related to both tobacco smoke and the vast quantity of diesel dust thrown up by all the lorries and especially buses whilst working in London. We had to wipe the stuff of daily. No air con in those days so open windows were a must. Dartford has now become a health hazard thanks to excellent planning by the numpties.

I seem to recall something in a Shakespeare play about the dangers of smoking. didn't QE1 also make a comment about smoking be bad for your health? It was know about long before the fifties as my dad thought it would be bad for your health in the late twenties.

Do people still smoke, as I don't see them these days?

Online John

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #67 on: December 13, 2023, 15:16:18 pm »
Been smoking for 40 years, and was on 40 a day over the last year or so! Gave up three weeks ago, probably much too late in life, but determined to keep away from them from now on. Go on, someone give me a pat on the head  ;D
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell

Offline PNK

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #68 on: December 13, 2023, 21:07:46 pm »
Pat pat.

Is there an emoji for a pat on the head or is that considered assault these days?

What I find alarming is that people are still taking up smoking, although probably at a far lower rate than when I was a teenager. I also find it baffling that long-time smokers blame the cigarette companies for not warning them about the dangers of smoking. It has been known about for over 100 years, probably much longer.

Whenever I see someone smoking in public I usually make a loud-ish comment " I didn't think people still smoked".

Now we have vaping clouds. Not nice when eating outside. Probably violates some byelaw.


Online pomme homme

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #69 on: December 13, 2023, 21:26:37 pm »
Well done on giving up, John. I did likewise, some years ago, when I'd weaned myself off cigarettes and onto small cigars. My wife had nagged me to give up. But being mean by nature, I didn't give up until I had smoked all the cigars I had. Since then I haven't touched tobacco - and, I'm glad to say, I haven't since felt the urge to go back.

Offline kate

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #70 on: January 30, 2024, 10:43:13 am »
Are we still patting, John? Good luck.
I have never smoked, but I like the smell of a cigar. My father only smoked at Christmas, and only 1 cigar a day - Mannikin (?)
Castella.Perhaps he didn't really like them!

Online John

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #71 on: January 30, 2024, 10:48:43 am »
Thanks Kate, every pat helps  ;D
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell

Offline PNK

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #72 on: January 30, 2024, 18:28:39 pm »
I was going to list all the Pat's I could think of but thought that was silly.

Cigars and pipe smoke were much better than the acrid smell of cigarettes. One of the last times I was forced to use a smoking carriage, due to a change in train formation, I stood opposite a chap who lit up a pipe. I was very surprised to see the Woodbine brigade (other brands were consumed) groan at the temerity of someone to light up a pipe and spoil the acrid smell. I can still remembered looking at the yellow stained roof and windows and wonder how many of those reached retirement. I never understood why smokers always shut the windows, even after I opened one.

One of my thoughts at the time was a money saving advert "Do you smoke? Save money on your pension. You probably won't live to draw it."  As I worked in an office and being one of the few non-smokers I did fear for my own health and with constant chest problems I suspect it might have been well founded.

Another thought was life insurance. If the insured died from smoking related causes is that regarded as self inflicted?


Offline Monkton Malc

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #73 on: February 01, 2024, 20:37:31 pm »
My dad smoked until I came along and he gave it up as he couldn't afford it and me as well. He is now 90 years old.
My mum never smoked and she is 86.
I smoked until about 6 years ago then stopped when I was diagnosed with COPD. I am now 60.
My wife gave up smoking a few weeks before Christmas when she had to have an operation. She is 46.
I hope that the kids don't start...

Blimey I had forgotten this thread.

Well done John for giving up. Don't go back to it.

Going by what I wrote it's been nearly 11 years since I gave up. My COPD hasn't got any better and I am now on home oxygen or a small portable cylinder when I go out.
Sadly my wife died 6 months after I wrote that from pancreatic cancer aged 46. My dad went on to be 93 until he succumbed to covid in 2021. Mum is still going strong at 92.
I have retired now that I'm 66 and I live by the sea. There's a difference in my breathing since moving from Ramsgate and later, Margate.


Offline PNK

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Re: Smoking
« Reply #74 on: February 05, 2024, 20:06:37 pm »
My mum had COPD and their bungalow was piped to feather the pumper oxygenated air. Dad was a bit old to lug the emergency cylinder though. I think mum found the sea air worse than inland air and regretted not staying at the temporary house they used in Dereham. She smoked and also had TB in the early sixties and had a cough for most of her adult life and the cough is what carried her off. The COPD wasn't spotted until their last holiday in Spain when mum couldn't be roused after falling asleep on the plane - lack of fed oxygen no doubt.

I now have shortness of breath and a persistent cough (not covid) so now worry I might be getting it, despite never smoking. It does make going to the dentist a challenge as they don't like it when you cough in their faces whilst drilling and filling.