Author Topic: Shoreham Airport  (Read 7014 times)

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Online John

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2022, 13:45:36 pm »
Daily Telegraph - 14th October 1968

A waterlogged runway did not prevent a Beagle Pup 150 aircraft from making a spectacular take-off at Shoreham airport, Sussex, during a test flight at the weekend. Only part of a runway was open yesterday because of flooding.
"You know, if you don’t read history, you’re a bloody idiot." - James Clavell

Online pomme homme

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2022, 14:14:27 pm »
Ah, the Pup 150/160 prototype, G-AVLM, in the days when Shoreham didn't have a hard runway but did have an aircraft manufacturing business!

Offline Tim Sargeant

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2022, 11:34:24 am »
A few paragraphs above (PH Sept 19th 2017) there is a reference to TIPE mines. When we took over the then Green Cross Hotel at Goudhurst in 1957
these premises included the site of the old Goudhurst Livestock Market. Around the cattle sale area there were iron pipe railings fencing off an area
some forty feet square  which the cattle would have been tied to awaiting sale. These railings consisted of metal pipes about 4 inches or so in diameter
supported on substantial timber posts. When we later installed a petrol station on part of this land we needed some pipes to lay the cables in underground
from the office to the petrol pumps and a length of this piping seemed just right for the job. I removed one length of these railings and dropped it into the
trench dug by the contractors for the purpose. However it wasn't possible to push anything through this pipe. A long stick probing it emerged with some
sticky stuff on the end which we thought must be a bees nest.
So I put all the old cement bags in the trench under this pipe and lit a good bonfire in order to warm it up and melt this waxy substance. After a while there
was a small bang and a puff of smoke out of the end of the pipe. A minute of so later there was a much louder bang and a package about 9" in length was
ejected from the pipe. Examination of this package revealed the label to read, "Nobels 808", "Explosive". We pretty quick put out the bonfire and got well
away and within a couple of hours the Bomb Squad were on the site. It turned out that these 'railings' had been made from some ex-government stuff which
was acquired from a source which we were never able to determine and several of the other railings on the site were found to have the ends sealed with a
plug of cement which had a couple of detonator wires sticking out of it! The Bomb Squad informed us that these were mines which were let into any large
fields which the enemy might have used for landing aircraft on during the War designed to blow trenches across such fields to prevent landing. They took
the remaining pipes away but did allow us to keep the length for our cables once they had cleared it of any residual explosive. They also told me that had
the weather been frosty the heat of my bonfire would have detonated the whole pipe mine causing devastation for a hundred yards around!

Way back in the 1950s we used to visit Shoreham Aerodrome on the way back to Brighton from our visits to Goodwood motor racing as my mother and father
were members of the Aero Club, not that they were flyers but it was a good place to stop off for a drink or two and we children could have a lemonade and a
bag of crisps (Smiths of course with the little blue packet of salt in them!) and watch the 'planes landing and taking off. There was another member who had
a glass making business and specialised in putting your signature in gold leaf writing into the glass. Both my mother and father had one of these made which
are beside me as I write. I have never been able to find out anything about this person, his business, or the process used.



Online Pete

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #33 on: March 13, 2022, 14:22:59 pm »
I never heard the term TIPE used PIPE yes. My EOD days were in the height of airfield Pipe mine clearance. They weren't set off by pressure but electrical detonation to crater the area to prevent landing so laid in rows or sometimes grids. Being pushed into the ground at a low angle meant the depth varied from a couple to 6 or so feet. The method had been used in WW1 to create trenches. The Canadian RE were tasked with clearing before they went back to Canada upon completion, hence many were overlooked
Sussex Bonfire - a way of life, not just for Nov 5th

Offline Tim Sargeant

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #34 on: March 13, 2022, 16:41:01 pm »
Maybe PH could explain just what these letters meant then. I assumed greater knowledge than me and thought it must be the initials
of something like...T?  I?  P = pipe  E = explosive or similar? They were referred to by BDS as 'Pipe Mines' as you say.
We had the front page of the Kent Messenger newspaper at the time! I thought I had the cutting scanned in but can't find it now.

Online pomme homme

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #35 on: March 13, 2022, 18:14:21 pm »
Maybe PH could explain just what these letters meant then.

I'm sorry, I haven't a clue! ;). I was just quoting from the book. I wondered whether, whilst doing so, I'd transcribed the text erroneously. Perhaps a T when a P appeared in the text? But no. I've revisited the book and it definitely says 'TIPE mines'. Whether that's a typographical error on the part of the authors of the book, I cannot say. I can only defer to those more knowledgeable than me on the subject of munitions.

Offline fltplanner

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2024, 15:56:43 pm »
According to John Stroud "Annals of British and Commonwealth Air Transport, a scheduled service from Shoreham to Ryde was started on 5th September 1932 by Portsmouth Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation.  The aircraft was Monospar ST4 G-ABVN, though Puss Moths were also used.   

Online pomme homme

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Re: Shoreham Airport
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2024, 17:29:43 pm »
Welcome to the forum, fltplanner, and thank you for your post. One must assume that the Portsmouth, Southsea & Isle of Wight Aviation service to Ryde did not attract large numbers of passengers. The Monospar ST-4 could carry only three and the Puss Moth could accomodate only two (both in addition to the pilot). But these were the early days of air services and only the few were sufficiently wealthy to be able to avail themselves of these.